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Re: [XP] Don't let them see our velocity?

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  • J. B. Rainsberger
    ... Oh, you mean load factor . The cycle begins again. ... J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca Your guide to software craftsmanship JUnit
    Message 1 of 342 , Jan 1, 2008
      On Dec 28, 2007, at 23:08 , Jon Eaves wrote:

      > I agree with both the sentiment and the reasoning. I've always tried
      > to
      > be transparent, but we had 2 agile project running and people kept
      > asking why
      > "velocity of team 1" was less than "velocity of team 2".
      >
      > It becomes very tiring to keep explaining that the number is
      > completely irrelevant
      > outside the project team, the current project and the group of
      > people that did the
      > estimates.
      >
      > We even coined a phrase called "reality co-efficient" which we use
      > in preference
      > to velocity. It's easier to explain that the "reality co-efficient"
      > is the number
      > that we use to translate our estimates into reality. This also has
      > the advantage
      > of being familiar to people who do function point analysis - where
      > an independent
      > number is used to multiply the "function points" to come up with the
      > "real time".
      >
      Oh, you mean "load factor". The cycle begins again.
      ----
      J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca
      Your guide to software craftsmanship
      JUnit Recipes: Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
      2005 Gordon Pask Award for contribution Agile Software Practice
    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, Ilja. On Saturday, February 16, 2008, at 6:23:42 PM, you ... Well, it sounds like it would take a pretty narrow set of ideas on how to improve
      Message 342 of 342 , Feb 16, 2008
        Hello, Ilja. On Saturday, February 16, 2008, at 6:23:42 PM, you
        wrote:

        > I expect this to increase our velocity in the middle run. And I'm all
        > for measuring it.

        > I doubt we would have even tried this event if we had focused on
        > improving velocity.

        > How does that sound to you?

        Well, it sounds like it would take a pretty narrow set of ideas on
        how to improve velocity. In a discussion on that, I would hope that
        ideas like learning, better tools, higher morale, and better
        communication would come up.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Anyone can make the simple complicated.
        Creativity is making the complicated simple. -- Charles Mingus
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