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Re: [XP] Don't let them see our velocity?

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  • J. B. Rainsberger
    ... Can numbers be misleading? I thought only people could misinterpret them. Are you saying that there are people you generally don t trust to interpret the
    Message 1 of 342 , Jan 1, 2008
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      On Dec 28, 2007, at 20:33 , George Dinwiddie wrote:

      > J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
      > > On Dec 28, 2007, at 14:33 , Charlie Poole wrote:
      > >> But then, I'm opposed to giving team velocity out to
      > >> folks outside the team as well. :-)
      > >>
      > > I hope I'm not taking this out of its context, but I'm intrigued and
      > > shocked by this statement. My blink reaction is to interpret it as
      > an
      > > unwillingness to be transparent, but that doesn't fit my model of
      > what
      > > you think, so why wouldn't you let people outside the team see its
      > > velocity?
      >
      > I'm not speaking for Charlie, but I agree with him on this. I don't
      > think the number has any meaning outside the team's planning sessions.
      > And it's too hard to convince people not to compare the numbers. If a
      > team had a velocity of 48 last iteration and 42 this one, that doesn't
      > mean they accomplished less or slacked off. It could be any number of
      > reasons, though estimation variations are the most likely. And the
      > same
      > goes double for comparisons between teams.
      >
      > In other words, I don't think it's transparent to publish these
      > numbers,
      > but rather misleading.
      >
      Can numbers be misleading? I thought only people could misinterpret
      them. Are you saying that there are people you generally don't trust
      to interpret the numbers? Is this an absolute position, or just a
      consequence of the typical people in that role you've dealt with
      recently?
      ----
      J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca
      Your guide to software craftsmanship
      JUnit Recipes: Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
      2005 Gordon Pask Award for contribution Agile Software Practice
    • Ron Jeffries
      Hello, Ilja. On Saturday, February 16, 2008, at 6:23:42 PM, you ... Well, it sounds like it would take a pretty narrow set of ideas on how to improve
      Message 342 of 342 , Feb 16, 2008
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        Hello, Ilja. On Saturday, February 16, 2008, at 6:23:42 PM, you
        wrote:

        > I expect this to increase our velocity in the middle run. And I'm all
        > for measuring it.

        > I doubt we would have even tried this event if we had focused on
        > improving velocity.

        > How does that sound to you?

        Well, it sounds like it would take a pretty narrow set of ideas on
        how to improve velocity. In a discussion on that, I would hope that
        ideas like learning, better tools, higher morale, and better
        communication would come up.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Anyone can make the simple complicated.
        Creativity is making the complicated simple. -- Charles Mingus
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