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A Proven Need Re:Visited

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  • Matt Heusser
    ... That is the most valuable for *marketing* and *sales*. If you look at what Paul Graham s Y-Combinator-Funded companies are doing, and how they do it, it
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 4, 2007
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      Simon Jones wrote:
      >I personally think (and its very much a personal perspective)
      >that the real value of agile is /not/ in startups etc at all. Its
      >at its most valuable in larger 'brand' organisations who
      >need to maintain their position by constantly staying
      >one step ahead.

      That is the most valuable for *marketing* and *sales*.

      If you look at what Paul Graham's Y-Combinator-Funded companies are doing,
      and how they do it, it looks a lot like Agile Circa 2002 - deliver working
      software in frequent iterations, so the simplest thing that could possibly
      work, and so on ...

      The Y-Combinator companies don't need to crow about how great their process
      is. They have a *product*, or they die. It's that simple.

      Regards,



      --
      Matthew Heusser,
      Blog: http://xndev.blogspot.com

      "...well over half of the time you spend working on a project (on the order
      of 70 percent) is spent thinking, and no tool, no matter how advanced, can
      think for you. Consequently, even if a tool did everything except the
      thinking for you -- if it wrote 100 percent of the code, wrote 100 percent
      of the documentation, did 100 percent of the testing, burned the CD-ROMs,
      put them in boxes, and mailed them to your customers -- the best you could
      hope for would be a 30 percent improvement in productivity. In order to do
      better than that, you have to change the way you think."
      -Frederick P. Brooks, [paraphrased]
      As quoted from
      http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-07-1999/jw-07-toolbox.html


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Slava Imeshev
      I would like to agree with Simon in that agile teams don t matter in startups, though for a different reason. From my limited experience, the business of
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 11, 2008
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        I would like to agree with Simon in that "agile teams" don't matter in
        startups, though for a different reason.

        From my limited experience, the business of VC-funded startups is very
        different from the business of product companies. VC-funded startups
        make money by selling to VCs a dream of getting rich. For this
        business the only thing that matters is how good the CEO of the
        startup is. As you can see, agility [of the startup staff] is
        irrelevant here.

        Regards,

        Slava Imeshev




        _____

        From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Matt Heusser
        Sent: Tuesday, December 04, 2007 4:57 AM
        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [XP] A Proven Need Re:Visited



        Simon Jones wrote:
        >I personally think (and its very much a personal perspective)
        >that the real value of agile is /not/ in startups etc at all. Its
        >at its most valuable in larger 'brand' organisations who
        >need to maintain their position by constantly staying
        >one step ahead.

        That is the most valuable for *marketing* and *sales*.

        If you look at what Paul Graham's Y-Combinator-Funded companies are
        doing,
        and how they do it, it looks a lot like Agile Circa 2002 - deliver
        working
        software in frequent iterations, so the simplest thing that could
        possibly
        work, and so on ...

        The Y-Combinator companies don't need to crow about how great their
        process
        is. They have a *product*, or they die. It's that simple.

        Regards,

        --
        Matthew Heusser,
        Blog: http://xndev. <http://xndev.blogspot.com> blogspot.com

        "...well over half of the time you spend working on a project (on the
        order
        of 70 percent) is spent thinking, and no tool, no matter how advanced,
        can
        think for you. Consequently, even if a tool did everything except the
        thinking for you -- if it wrote 100 percent of the code, wrote 100
        percent
        of the documentation, did 100 percent of the testing, burned the
        CD-ROMs,
        put them in boxes, and mailed them to your customers -- the best you
        could
        hope for would be a 30 percent improvement in productivity. In order
        to do
        better than that, you have to change the way you think."
        -Frederick P. Brooks, [paraphrased]
        As quoted from
        http://www.javaworl
        <http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-07-1999/jw-07-toolbox.html>
        d.com/javaworld/jw-07-1999/jw-07-toolbox.html

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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