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Re: [XP] Honoring Personal Development Time - Update

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  • Ron Jeffries
    Hello, Chris. On Tuesday, October 30, 2007, at 9:57:29 PM, you ... I m sure that you would be mostly responsible. And I certainly would. But the rest of these
    Message 1 of 89 , Nov 1, 2007
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      Hello, Chris. On Tuesday, October 30, 2007, at 9:57:29 PM, you
      wrote:

      > Sure, that sounds great. I doubt this is sustainable in a larger corporation
      > given the demands on director-level people, but your experience says it can
      > be done so I'll trust you. I think Steve Gordon's idea of rolling PDT into
      > compensation and then forgetting about it is a better approach because it
      > takes management control away - my manager can't tell me how to spend my
      > paycheque, and they can't tell me not to blow the afternoon off and go see a
      > movie either. Of course, if it's part of my compensation, and I know that I
      > get all afternoon, or all day, or whatever, to play with cool new stuff, I'd
      > most likely do that most of the time, the same way I would spend my pay
      > responsibly, most of the time.

      I'm sure that you would be mostly responsible. And I certainly
      would. But the rest of these guys? I have my doubts. ;->

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Assume that anything you didn't like was the funny stuff.
      -- Jim Shore
    • Kent Beck
      All, It seems to me that the important issue in the original story is intent: were the people who we are discussing trying to learn something or were they
      Message 89 of 89 , Nov 4, 2007
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        All,

        It seems to me that the important issue in the original story is intent:
        were the people who we are discussing trying to learn something or were they
        knowingly and secretly breaking the social contract to get more work done in
        this iteration. That is something you can only find out by asking them. If
        they were lying, even covertly, that's a far bigger issue than whether they
        learned anything or not or whether they produced useful functionality. And
        the lack of communication up front is also a problem.

        Were I setting up PDT in an XP way, I would emphasize the values of
        communication, feedback, courage, and respect and the principles of
        accountability and responsibility. A compatible format would be to ask
        everyone at lunch on Friday to say what they were going to do and Monday
        morning to ask them what they learned, with emphasis on practical impact on
        the project. If executives are interested, someone would summarize the plans
        and results and send them a copy (or invite them to the meetings).

        If someone wanted an exception to the goals of PDT, Friday lunch would be
        the time to discuss it. If it was my money, I would view PDT as a productive
        form of slack. If the choice was between reneging on a customer commitment
        and learning a little about Ruby, I hope the team would choose to take care
        of the customer (with reflection to figure out why they mis-estimated). If
        the choice was between adding one more story that the customer wasn't really
        expecting and honoring PDT, I hope the team would stick with PDT. If the
        choice was between adding a story the customer really really wants on Monday
        and would consider a personal favor and honoring PDT, then you have an
        interesting discussion.

        Cheers,

        Kent Beck
        Three Rivers Institute

        _____

        From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Simon Jones
        Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 2:15 AM
        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [XP] Re: Honoring Personal Development Time - Update



        --- In extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
        yahoogroups.com, Ron Jeffries
        <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello, Chris. On Tuesday, October 30, 2007, at 9:57:29 PM, you
        > wrote:
        >
        > > Sure, that sounds great. I doubt this is sustainable in a larger
        corporation
        > > given the demands on director-level people, but your experience
        says it can
        > > be done so I'll trust you. I think Steve Gordon's idea of
        rolling PDT into
        > > compensation and then forgetting about it is a better approach
        because it
        > > takes management control away - my manager can't tell me how to
        spend my
        > > paycheque, and they can't tell me not to blow the afternoon off
        and go see a
        > > movie either. Of course, if it's part of my compensation, and I
        know that I
        > > get all afternoon, or all day, or whatever, to play with cool
        new stuff, I'd
        > > most likely do that most of the time, the same way I would spend
        my pay
        > > responsibly, most of the time.
        >
        > I'm sure that you would be mostly responsible. And I certainly
        > would. But the rest of these guys? I have my doubts. ;->

        Question. Does it matter what they spend the time doing? I can think
        of any number of good movies (although less so these days) that
        might help expand ones thinking and that may even be directly
        applicable to the domain.

        I could also make a good case for doing absolutely nothing! If the
        company pays for me to spend a few hours doing what I like, then I
        choose to relax, drink tea and blow smoke rings. I feel better, I
        ponder subjects that are otherwise drowned out by the 'noise' of
        work and most importantly I relax.

        I suspect the only restriction on PDT should be:
        Don't do work.
        Don't do chores.

        Simon

        >
        > Ron Jeffries
        > www.XProgramming.com
        > Assume that anything you didn't like was the funny stuff.
        > -- Jim Shore
        >






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