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[extremeprogramming] Re: Collective Ownership vs. CollectiveCode Ownership [Stupid XP Question No 265]

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  • Don Wells
    max bareis wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/extremeprogramming/?start =124 ... I have. About 15 years ago now there
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 6, 2000
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      max bareis <madma-@...> wrote:
      original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/extremeprogramming/?start
      =124
      > Many programmers I
      > know are a bit selfish and love their own code. […] Has anyone of
      > you ever integrated a kind of hardcore autistic programmer?

      I have. About 15 years ago now there was this programmer who believed
      he
      could program better than anyone else in the world. One summer two of
      us
      were on an AI project together. We scheduled our vacations such that
      one week
      I was off and the other he was off. Being a strong believer in having
      a
      project comedian on every project I played a little joke on him. While
      he was
      on vacation I completely rewrote all of his code! Top to bottom! It
      worked
      great. When he came in on Monday he opened up a browser and said:
      "what the
      hell happened to my code!" Unfortunately I was on vacation at the
      time. But
      I knew exactly what he said and how surprised he was because when I got
      back
      from vacation I opened my browser and said the exact same thing. By
      the end
      of the summer no one knew whose code was whose. And you know what? No
      one
      cared because we had reduced an entire AI system to about 2 pages of
      extremely
      well written LISP code. It was then that I had to admit that I could
      not
      program better than anyone else in the world and that working together
      with
      someone (even in a demented sort of way) produced much better results.

      Since I learned XP a couple years ago I have met 5 programmers just
      like me,
      but with out the benefit of a little joke back firing. The bottom line
      is you
      need to be patient and set a good example. Of those 5 "world's
      greatest
      programmers" 3 have become team players now. I think that makes it
      worth
      trying to convert people.

      If you are in your cube they will jump up from sitting next to you and
      run
      away. Remain clam and patient, minimize the browser and work on
      something else until they return then pop it up and continue with them.

      If you are in their cube they will try to squeeze you out from in front
      of the
      monitor and keyboard. Remain calm and point to something on the far
      side of
      the screen forcing them to back up a bit. Remain patient, they aren't
      going
      to just let you take a turn typing voluntarily. You must point and
      tell them
      what you want typed. Rest assured that eventually they will tire of
      listening
      to you and typing what you say and push the keyboard over to you.

      Sometimes you are not the right person for the job. I have seen people
      warm
      up to pair programming after pairing up with the right person. All of
      a
      sudden the two of them are laughing hysterically, having the time of
      their
      lives, and writing code all at the same time.

      It takes a long time for someone to realize that working together is
      better
      and faster than working alone. Often times it isn't until the last day
      of the
      project or after someone has left that they will say to you: "I
      understand
      what you were trying to tell me." Pair programming with one of these
      types of
      programmers can be a lot like taming a wild horse. Be gentle, yet firm
      and
      always consistent. In the end it is very satisfying.

      Don
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