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Lean Software Development and XP

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  • Chris Wheeler
    Fellows, I ve just finished reading Implementing Lean Software Development: Concept to Cash and found it interesting because I am currently working as a Lean
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 2, 2007
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      Fellows,

      I've just finished reading 'Implementing Lean Software Development: Concept
      to Cash' and found it interesting because I am currently working as a Lean
      Six Sigma black belt and have a background as an XP coach and programmer.

      As I said, while I found it interesting, I also found that when I finished
      reading the book, I could not see many differences between LeanSD and
      XP/Scrum. In fact, to me, it appears that LeanSD is a theoretical support
      for agile methods and not necessarily a software development methodology.

      I'm also of the mind that the Lean argument for XP/Scrum/Agile could be
      stronger. Some of the anecdotes seemed weak, as did the application of
      queuing theory and the mapping of the seven forms of waste (although I agree
      that there is a lean mapping, I just think it's more overt than the book
      claims). Additionally, I think that there could be much strengthening of the
      Lean position if additional work was done to link statistical process
      control to agile methods and to explore variation and capability a little
      deeper.

      That said, I was happy with the way that Mary & Tom (my apologies,we aren't
      on a first name basis, but I can't spell their surname from memory) put an
      emphasis on process failure, not people failure, and pushed the paradigm
      that process failures are management issues. Also, the constant vigilance
      around poke-yoke (mistake-proofing), in my mind, is the number one thing
      that agile teams need to learn to do better.

      All in all, a very interesting read that I think could be made stronger with
      some community work.

      So, after all that rambling, I've a question: Some on this list have said
      that they practice lean software development and I'm curious to hear what it
      is that you do in your practices that make you believe that you do practice
      LeanSD.

      Thanks,

      Chris.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • J. B. Rainsberger
      ... Indeed so. When I read the first Poppendiecks book on the subject, that was the precise impression I got: this was the theoretical basis for agile
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 2, 2007
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        Chris Wheeler wrote:

        > As I said, while I found it interesting, I also found that when I finished
        > reading the book, I could not see many differences between LeanSD and
        > XP/Scrum. In fact, to me, it appears that LeanSD is a theoretical support
        > for agile methods and not necessarily a software development methodology.

        Indeed so. When I read the first Poppendiecks' book on the subject, that
        was the precise impression I got: this was the theoretical basis for
        agile software development. When I read Concept to Cash (or
        "Poppendiecks' 2: The Re-Leaning"), it felt very much the same.

        <snip />
        > So, after all that rambling, I've a question: Some on this list have said
        > that they practice lean software development and I'm curious to hear what it
        > is that you do in your practices that make you believe that you do practice
        > LeanSD.

        Hm. I don't claim to "do Lean", but I mostly use Lean and agile as
        synonyms, rightly or wrongly.

        Take care.
        --
        J. B. (Joe) Rainsberger :: http://www.jbrains.ca
        Your guide to software craftsmanship
        JUnit Recipes: Practical Methods for Programmer Testing
        2005 Gordon Pask Award for contribution Agile Software Practice
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