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Re: [XP] Blog post for discussion

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  • George Dinwiddie
    ... Yeah, the difference between a rut and a grave is the depth. ... Good advice (anyone remember Computer Language magazine?), but there s other stuff to
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
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      David Carlton wrote:
      > On Wed, 1 Aug 2007 09:52:27 -0400 (EDT), "George Dinwiddie" <lists@...> said:
      >
      >> In any event, people get stuck on things other than the first thing
      >> they do. Virginia Satir said, "Familiarity exerts a powerful
      >> pull. What we have observed and experienced day after day exerts a
      >> powerful influence. Most people will choose the familiar, even
      >> though uncomfortable, over the unfamiliar, because of that power."
      >
      > I liked the bit in QSM v.4 where Weinberg was talking about the Satir
      > change model, and basically recommended (if I'm remembering correctly)
      > never staying too long in a mastery phase: "New Status Quo", when
      > you've become comfortable and productive with a new skill, is great,
      > but when it turns into "Old Status Quo", it's not so great. Not only
      > does that specific skill lose its freshness and adaptiveness, but your
      > skill at change in general will atrophy if it doesn't get used.

      Yeah, the difference between a rut and a grave is the depth.

      > On the same vein, the pragmatics recommend learning a new programming
      > language every year.

      Good advice (anyone remember Computer Language magazine?), but there's
      other stuff to learn than just programming languages. Learning just one
      type of new thing is another stuckness.

      - George

      --
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
      Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
      Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
      ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Ilja Preuss
      Hi Joe! ... Without having read the blog entry, it seems to me that the analogy is too simplistic to be helpful in this regard. There are a lot of potential
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 4, 2007
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        Hi Joe!

        > I don't know how to
        > help someone else see past their own imprinting, except to make them
        > aware it's happening, then wait.

        Without having read the blog entry, it seems to me that the analogy is
        too simplistic to be helpful in this regard. There are a lot of
        potential reasons to not try something new, and if we understand which
        ones apply, we might be in a better position to decide what to do about it.

        Some reasons might include:

        - I feel that I can't afford to have my effectiveness reduced even for a
        short moment, which trying a new tool certainly will,

        - my learning capacity is limited, and there are other things that look
        more intersting to me,

        - using the current tool is just fine, and I don't feel like I need
        something better,

        - my experience with this kind of tools in the past hasn't been good,

        - people I trust don't use those tools, either,

        - etc. pp.

        I'm sure you can come up with more.

        Regards, Ilja
      • Simon Jones
        Well... I still use vi (albeit gvim) ... might ... creature ... that ... example used is ... the one ... productivity using ... organisation ... benefits.
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 4, 2007
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          Well... I still use vi (albeit gvim)



          --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Adrian Mowat"
          <mowat27@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi all,
          >
          > I just read this article on a blog I subscribe to and I think it
          might
          > interest this group...
          >
          > http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000921.html
          >
          > In summary, if has been found that animals "imprint on the first
          creature
          > they see shortly after birth" and the author of the post argues
          that
          > developers have a similar reaction to trying new tools. The
          example used is
          > that we might be reluctant to try a new IDE because we are used to
          the one
          > we have always used and are still trying to maximise our
          productivity using
          > it.
          >
          > I believe we often see a similar effect when trying to get an
          organisation
          > to try new Agile ideas - no matter how hard we work to explain the
          benefits.
          >
          > Thoughts?
          >
          > Cheers
          >
          > Adrian
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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