Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [XP] Blog post for discussion

Expand Messages
  • David Carlton
    ... I liked the bit in QSM v.4 where Weinberg was talking about the Satir change model, and basically recommended (if I m remembering correctly) never staying
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      On Wed, 1 Aug 2007 09:52:27 -0400 (EDT), "George Dinwiddie" <lists@...> said:

      > In any event, people get stuck on things other than the first thing
      > they do. Virginia Satir said, "Familiarity exerts a powerful
      > pull. What we have observed and experienced day after day exerts a
      > powerful influence. Most people will choose the familiar, even
      > though uncomfortable, over the unfamiliar, because of that power."

      I liked the bit in QSM v.4 where Weinberg was talking about the Satir
      change model, and basically recommended (if I'm remembering correctly)
      never staying too long in a mastery phase: "New Status Quo", when
      you've become comfortable and productive with a new skill, is great,
      but when it turns into "Old Status Quo", it's not so great. Not only
      does that specific skill lose its freshness and adaptiveness, but your
      skill at change in general will atrophy if it doesn't get used.

      On the same vein, the pragmatics recommend learning a new programming
      language every year.

      David Carlton
      carlton@...
    • George Dinwiddie
      ... Yeah, the difference between a rut and a grave is the depth. ... Good advice (anyone remember Computer Language magazine?), but there s other stuff to
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        David Carlton wrote:
        > On Wed, 1 Aug 2007 09:52:27 -0400 (EDT), "George Dinwiddie" <lists@...> said:
        >
        >> In any event, people get stuck on things other than the first thing
        >> they do. Virginia Satir said, "Familiarity exerts a powerful
        >> pull. What we have observed and experienced day after day exerts a
        >> powerful influence. Most people will choose the familiar, even
        >> though uncomfortable, over the unfamiliar, because of that power."
        >
        > I liked the bit in QSM v.4 where Weinberg was talking about the Satir
        > change model, and basically recommended (if I'm remembering correctly)
        > never staying too long in a mastery phase: "New Status Quo", when
        > you've become comfortable and productive with a new skill, is great,
        > but when it turns into "Old Status Quo", it's not so great. Not only
        > does that specific skill lose its freshness and adaptiveness, but your
        > skill at change in general will atrophy if it doesn't get used.

        Yeah, the difference between a rut and a grave is the depth.

        > On the same vein, the pragmatics recommend learning a new programming
        > language every year.

        Good advice (anyone remember Computer Language magazine?), but there's
        other stuff to learn than just programming languages. Learning just one
        type of new thing is another stuckness.

        - George

        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        * George Dinwiddie * http://blog.gdinwiddie.com
        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Ilja Preuss
        Hi Joe! ... Without having read the blog entry, it seems to me that the analogy is too simplistic to be helpful in this regard. There are a lot of potential
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 4, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Joe!

          > I don't know how to
          > help someone else see past their own imprinting, except to make them
          > aware it's happening, then wait.

          Without having read the blog entry, it seems to me that the analogy is
          too simplistic to be helpful in this regard. There are a lot of
          potential reasons to not try something new, and if we understand which
          ones apply, we might be in a better position to decide what to do about it.

          Some reasons might include:

          - I feel that I can't afford to have my effectiveness reduced even for a
          short moment, which trying a new tool certainly will,

          - my learning capacity is limited, and there are other things that look
          more intersting to me,

          - using the current tool is just fine, and I don't feel like I need
          something better,

          - my experience with this kind of tools in the past hasn't been good,

          - people I trust don't use those tools, either,

          - etc. pp.

          I'm sure you can come up with more.

          Regards, Ilja
        • Simon Jones
          Well... I still use vi (albeit gvim) ... might ... creature ... that ... example used is ... the one ... productivity using ... organisation ... benefits.
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 4, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Well... I still use vi (albeit gvim)



            --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Adrian Mowat"
            <mowat27@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi all,
            >
            > I just read this article on a blog I subscribe to and I think it
            might
            > interest this group...
            >
            > http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000921.html
            >
            > In summary, if has been found that animals "imprint on the first
            creature
            > they see shortly after birth" and the author of the post argues
            that
            > developers have a similar reaction to trying new tools. The
            example used is
            > that we might be reluctant to try a new IDE because we are used to
            the one
            > we have always used and are still trying to maximise our
            productivity using
            > it.
            >
            > I believe we often see a similar effect when trying to get an
            organisation
            > to try new Agile ideas - no matter how hard we work to explain the
            benefits.
            >
            > Thoughts?
            >
            > Cheers
            >
            > Adrian
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.