Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [XP] What is Good Code?

Expand Messages
  • rett
    Manuel, Cheers...I love it, and I really don t disagree with you much. So, OK, just what characteristics of a language do you find important, and which
    Message 1 of 154 , May 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Manuel,

      Cheers...I love it, and I really don't disagree with you much. So, OK,
      just what characteristics of a language do you find important, and which
      language or languages do you think exhibit those characteristics. The
      categories I chose were deliberately extreme, but I am sure that there
      are other categorizations that are useful.

      And, we have at least one point of agreement, on regex's, though from
      opposite sides of the fence. I won't use what I cannot expect someone
      else to be able to read, unless the piece of code I am writing is purely
      for my own use...and I do realize that is a trap. I shudder to think how
      often in my career, a piece of unlovely but functional trash was grabbed
      and thrown into production and never dealt with again while I was at
      that company. In fact, I can almost hear the whines of those who were
      assigned to "fix" them. One does have to watch these things.

      At one company where I pretended to work, I was assigned a piece
      of code to fix. Now, you must understand that every piece of code
      had to be signed by the author and by at least two reviewers before it
      went into production. This code had no author and no reviewers, and
      that should have set off alarm bells in my head, knowing my immediate
      supervisor, but I trod where angels fear, going to my boss with a 15 minute
      rant on the defects of this truly awful piece of code. I told him that
      there
      was absolutely nothing that could or should be preserved from that
      code. Now, I should have noticed that he let me go on and on about
      it, but eventually I slowed down long enough to ask him if he knew which
      idiot had written it....yeh...you guessed it...it was his first piece of
      code
      for the company, many years before, and it was awful. Fortunately, he
      knew it was awful and got more fun out of my discomfort than you can
      imagine. So, I'm sure we all have a few such axe murders in our closets,
      but knowing how they got to be that way is more important than the
      errors themselves.

      Everett L.(Rett) Williams II

      Manuel Klimek wrote:
      > rett,
      >
      > On 4/30/07, rett <rett@...> wrote:
      >
      >> But, what I was seeking here was opinions. Almost everyone has
      >> them, and though I seldom entirely agree with any of them, I get a lot
      >> more out of a strong opinion than I ever do out of something carefully
      >> phrased to avoid offending.
      >>
      >
      > I had a discussion with my dad a few days ago in which he told
      > me exactly the same thing and blamed my youth ;-)
      >
      > Ok, so I'll try to formulate a strong opinion:
      > I think it's pointless to classify languages into such
      > simple categories as read-only, write-only and read/write.
      >
      > When you choose a language for a project you should
      > try to find the best fit. Saying things like
      > "that awful things like C++ templates don't move
      > in and contaminate their product"
      > is like saying that static typing is the worst
      > thing since the Teletubbies.
      >
      > I really like discussing the pros and cons of languages
      > (I /really/ do ;-), but on a feature-by-feature basis, this
      > way everybody may learn from it.
      >
      > Oh, and I love regexps. I use them. I have to admit
      > that I think they're read-only, too ;-)
      >
      > Was that enough opinion?
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Manuel
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William Tozier
      ... Can t resist: Now is the funny word in that sentence. ... Bill Tozier AIM: vaguery@mac.com; Skype: vaguery; Twitter: Vaguery
      Message 154 of 154 , May 2, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        On May 2, 2007, at 5:58 AM, Elizabeth Keogh wrote:

        > I think you're being picky now.

        Can't resist: "Now" is the funny word in that sentence.
        -----
        Bill Tozier
        AIM: vaguery@...; Skype: vaguery; Twitter: Vaguery
        thttp://williamtozier.com/slurry

        "People who write obscurely are either unskilled in writing or up to
        mischief."
        -- Sir Peter Medawar
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.