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RES: [XP] Re: Do it by the book

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  • Daniel Wildt
    ... I have the same problem, but it is a little different. I have resistance from experienced programmers that don t want to be attached to XP or Scrum or TDD
    Message 1 of 529 , May 1, 2007
      Hello, Steve. On Monday, April 30, 2007, at 1:49:30 PM, you wrote:
      > I think you have a good point. Most of the resistance I have seen has been
      > more around the honest belief that such a set of practices just won't work.
      > Especially the more experienced programmers. There is a certain sense of
      > "been there, done that, didn't work" that gets in the way of trying the new
      > thing.

      Ron Jeffries wrote:
      > That really confuses me, unless they don't know what the practices
      > really are. The things we teach are the things that have always
      > worked.


      I have the same problem, but it is a little different. I have resistance from experienced programmers that don't want to be attached
      to XP or Scrum or TDD for instance. They want to do their job and deliver their work. So, in this case I'm working with questions,
      asking them things like "Ok, I see you are doing a great job, but you believe that it can't get any better than it is right now?". I
      ask them to tell me how they work in a specific situation, and I try to tell them that that situation could be improved if they use
      practices X, Y and Z. So I ask them why don't we try to use those practices and do some kind of measure after two weeks. I ask them:
      Do you think this is possible?

      With this kind of questioning I try to make those experienced developers think about their roots and all the things they can't
      change (they think that they can't change).

      It is all about getting the right questions to make people think and question the way they are. That's difficult, because nobody
      wants to say Ok, I'm not doing a great job. But that's not the point. They can be doing a great job. We just want their job to be
      better than it is today. Who wants to be more happy? :-)

      At the end, you will see that it is all about continuous improvement, Kaizen, Toyota, it is all about change the way people think to
      make they realize that they keep creating big walls in front of them.

      To find out the best question to make, I'm studying NLP (Neuro-linguistic programming
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuro-linguistic_programming) which is helping me a lot.

      Regards,
      Daniel wildt

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    • Murali Krishna Devarakonda
      ... You are right, of course. But my list was only intended to illustrate and discuss the idea - not to discuss the list itself. I really wanted to focus on
      Message 529 of 529 , May 6, 2007
        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Kelly Anderson"
        <kellycoinguy@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 4/29/07, Murali Krishna Devarakonda <muralikd@...> wrote:
        > > Over the last two decades, I've seen resistance to practically every
        > > "successful" technology-framework-process-whatever first-hand.
        ...
        >
        > > Yet, to simplify , why do programmers "zealously" resist change-
        > > particularly in those cases where we can now say with hindsight that
        > > it was for the better, i.e. "successful"?
        >
        > Just because something is eventually successful, does not necessarily
        > mean that early adoption means early success. In fact, you could
        > probably make an effective argument against early adoption of
        > development tools/methodologies. Look how much has been learned by the
        > bleeding edgers, and use what has been proven to work is a reasonably
        > successful way to go for many endeavors.
        >
        > -Kelly

        You are right, of course. But my list was only intended to illustrate
        and discuss the idea - not to discuss the list itself. I really wanted
        to focus on "successes" and discuss what goes on in the minds of
        programmers who resist the *idea* behind the product that eventually
        becomes a "success".

        I'm going to post my thoughts on this in another thread.
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