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Re: [XP] Re: [OT] Duplicate notices from Agile 2007?

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  • Ron Jeffries
    ... Yes it is. The submission system was not written using XP or any Agile method, as far as I know. ... It s hard to imagine any test of that code that would
    Message 1 of 156 , Apr 3 3:48 AM
      Hello, Dave. On Tuesday, April 3, 2007, at 2:58:51 AM, you wrote:

      > Uh, Ron, isn't one of the purported benefits of XP increased software
      > quality? Or has that just been a pleasant side effect that I've
      > encountered?

      Yes it is. The submission system was not written using XP or any
      Agile method, as far as I know.

      > Maybe I'm just bitter - my discovery session was rejected. It was
      > entitled "Testing Blind Spots", and spoke of the need to performance and
      > stress testing in addition to the programmer and customer testing that
      > we usually perform. Kind of ironic, isn't it?

      It's hard to imagine any test of that code that would not have
      discovered the problem. I'm not amused by it and plan to try to find
      a productive way to address it.

      But I still wonder why that comment, on this list.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Agility might be said to be about encountering
      all the problems so early and so often that the
      effort to fix them is less than the pain of enduring them.
    • John Roth
      From: Elizabeth Keogh To: Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 7:11 AM Subject: Re: [XP] Agile
      Message 156 of 156 , Apr 18 9:13 AM
        From: "Elizabeth Keogh" <ekeogh@...>
        To: <extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2007 7:11 AM
        Subject: Re: [XP] Agile Explanations?


        > Robert Biddle wrote on 17/04/2007 19:58:01:
        >
        >> And when customer-side people bridle at language like "planning game"
        > and
        >> "process smell", then the conversation may be brief.
        >> Lest I seem speculative, I should perhaps mention that I am not making
        > up
        >> these examples: they come from my discussions with people on the
        > customer side.
        >
        > This was our brief conversation:
        >
        > "What's a planning game?"
        >
        > "It's a meeting in which you get the opportunity to prioritise the stories
        > you want, and steer the direction of the iteration."
        >
        > "Can't we call it Iteration Steering, then?"

        You could, but I wouldn't because there's already a meeting with
        that purpose: iteration planning. It's done at the beginning of each
        iteration.

        If I didn't want to call it the Planning Game, I might suggest
        Project Planning or Release Planning. Both of those terms
        suggest taking a look at the project (or at least the release)
        as a whole. Of course, the customer may very well have another
        name that's part of the organization culture.

        John Roth
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Liz.
        >
        > --
        > Elizabeth Keogh
        > liz@...
        > http://sirenian.livejournal.com
        > http://jbehave.org
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
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