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RE: [XP] to XP or not

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  • David Winslow
    Thanks for your feedback. I have incorporated it into the user stories. Best Regards David Winslow Syspro Software Architect 073 6923 586
    Message 1 of 19 , Apr 1 11:17 PM
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      Thanks for your feedback. I have incorporated it into the user stories.



      Best Regards

      David Winslow
      Syspro Software Architect

      073 6923 586
      <mailto:david.winslow@...>
      david.winslow@...
      086 510 1481
      <http://www.professional-it.co.za> www.professional-it.co.za





      _____

      From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dnicolet99
      Sent: 29 March 2007 08:37 PM
      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [XP] to XP or not



      --- In extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
      yahoogroups.com, "David Winslow"
      <david.winslow@...> wrote:
      >

      Your sense of smell is reliable.

      This is a great example of exactly the kind of problem Steve was
      talking about.

      This formulation...

      > A Customer will phone in to inform us that part of this travel has been
      > cancelled. Instead of going to a-b-c and d he wants to go to a-b and c.
      >
      > The system removes "D" from the booking and calculates a new cost
      for the
      > booking.
      >
      > A reason for the cancellation must be given.

      ...reads like a "course of events" narrative in a use case. To
      reformulate the same requirements in the form of "user stories", you
      might consider something like the following:

      * As a reservation agent, when a customer requests a change in their
      itinerary I want to be able to remove selected segments from the
      itinerary and record the reason for the change, so that we can provide
      timely reservation services to our customers.

      * As an operations person, when a customer cancels a reservation for a
      car and driver I want the system to adjust the availability dates of
      the car and driver accordingly, so that we can allocate them to other
      customers as needed.

      * As a rates person, when a customer changes their itinerary such that
      the credit card charge is reduced I want the system to know that it is
      unnecessary to preauthorize the payment again, so that we can avoid
      needless transaction charges with the credit authorization service.

      * As a rates person, when a customer changes their itinerary I want
      the system to recalculate the charges for the booking automatically,
      so that we will have up to date charges on record.

      I don't know whether those stories are exactly what you need, but I'm
      trying to illustrate the difference in how you would write a "user
      story" as compared with a "course of events" narrative. With a user
      story, we're interested in who the end user is, what behavior they
      want to see from the system in response to one particular set of
      inputs, and what value they expect to receive from it all. It's just a
      brief statement from the end user's point of view. In a use case,
      we're interested in specifying the exact sequence of events that must
      occur. It's more detailed than a user story and may have a very
      different scope. As Steve explained, a use case doesn't always (well,
      almost never) maps exactly to a user story on a one-for-one basis.

      When you're analyzing the use cases, trust your instincts to recognize
      when you can pull out a reasonable user story. Based on what you've
      written here so far, I think you'll do very well.





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