Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: revive xp at my company

Expand Messages
  • eliga_repoleved
    ... Thanks for the great advice. I think this is a realistic point of view. The main reason xp was left behind, was due to one cto who was hired, who did not
    Message 1 of 44 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "banshee858" <cnett858@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > How would you start the process of change back to using xp?
      > >
      > Good, useful advice from others, but let me provide the cynical
      > perspective - it will not work. Unless you were hired specifically to
      > return this group back to XP, you are in for a world of frustration
      > and unhappiness. For some reason, this group decided not to use XP
      > anymore because it was no longer valuable to them. If it had provided
      > value, then I suspect it would have continued to be in use. IMO, they
      > obviously value something else and unless XP can provided greater
      > value (equal value will not cut it because you are asking people to
      > change), I suspect your efforts will not succeed the way you are
      > imaging them to. Maybe you have really low expectations and then
      > perhaps you will be surprised?
      >
      > If I were to start, I would investigate on why the group choose to
      > stop. I suspect there may have been technical issues (not enough
      > automated testing, refactoring, not able to deploy their software
      > rapidly, etc.) and\or communication issues (management did not
      > understand the information coming from the team, design was not
      > shared, etc.). Knowing what caused the group to stop is only the
      > first step. The harder part is then to figure out what are the
      > CURRENT issues facing the group. Then I would try help the group
      > arrive at an agreement on what the problems are AND that XP will help
      > solve them. That is a non-trivial task, but truly the most important.
      > IMO, XP will never be used unless there is an agreement that XP
      > solves what everyone perceives to be the problems.
      >
      > Finally, since any agile team is sensitive to skillful and motivated
      > individuals, the next step would to gather all those people into a
      > single team. While the skill barrier can be overcome with time and\or
      > training, if the team members and outside stakeholders are not that
      > interested, then I am guessing you will have revived XP to only see it
      > wither away again.
      >
      > At least that is my perspective.
      >
      > Carlton
      >


      Thanks for the great advice. I think this is a realistic point of
      view. The main reason xp was left behind, was due to one cto who was
      hired, who did not like xp, and chose to remove it's use from the
      company. The cto is gone now. Many of the practices are still
      followed, but not all. I replied in another post with more detail.
    • Ian Collins
      ... That sums the issue up very well, sometimes asking someone to get up and use a white board is like the old fissioned stick the interviewee on the opposite
      Message 44 of 44 , Feb 7, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Ron Jeffries wrote:

        >Hello, William. On Wednesday, February 7, 2007, at 8:59:11 AM, you
        >wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >>If an interviewee doesn't engage in a conversation but
        >>pontificates, I'd point out explicitly that I'm looking for a
        >>directed chat and not a showoff lecture. If they fail to understand
        >>what I mean at that point (and long after explicit prefatory
        >>remarks), I have a really important piece of information about their
        >>understanding of what we do and how we do it.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >Yes. However, I'd say that the "you at the whiteboard and me and my
        >staff behind this big table" sets the situation up particularly
        >badly. "All of us around this table," with whiteboard available ...
        >and perhaps even some suitable gesturing where we all get up if the
        >interviewee gets up to go to the whiteboard ... seems to me to be
        >more likely to elicit what one wants.
        >
        >
        >
        That sums the issue up very well, sometimes asking someone to get up and
        use a white board is like the old fissioned stick the interviewee on the
        opposite side of the table to the interviewers situation.

        Some of the best pairs I have worked with have been strong introverts
        who would clam up if asked to stand up, unprepared, at a whiteboard.
        The first thing I try a gauge at an interview is whether the candidate
        is an introvert or an extrovert and tailor the process accordingly.

        Ian
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.