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Re: revive xp at my company

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  • eliga_repoleved
    I am experienced with all the practices having followed them for many years. The team was following all the xp practices in the past, but at some point in the
    Message 1 of 44 , Feb 1, 2007
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      I am experienced with all the practices having followed them for many
      years.

      The team was following all the xp practices in the past, but at some
      point in the recent past an agile phobic cto, came in and completely
      dismantled the xp team.

      Most of the folks in the company were very happy using xp. But after
      the one cto came in and killed the use of xp, it was replaced with one
      "super smart" architect with big up front design, requirements, all
      the typical old school shit.

      Good news is that the cto is gone. There are new managers. Some of
      the folks still practice pairing, tdd, iterations, daily stand up,
      continuous integration, with the whole team sitting in one area. We
      are missing some other practices like letting the customer prioritize
      the work. And we don't currently use the planning game. Releases
      also take way way too long. There is a long qa cycle. The code is
      actually in decent shape and has unit tests for most of the classes.

      All in all things are actually quite well, compared with some other
      places I have seen.

      But there are some issues, with developers getting pulled on and off
      project. Support interruptions. Random folks showing up in the bull
      pen and interrupting the work. And there is still a hero culture.

      I want to go back to the basics, and follow full rigorous, disciplined
      xp following all the practices -- until the team has re-experienced
      what it feels like to get in the rhythm of delivering high quality
      software often.
    • Ian Collins
      ... That sums the issue up very well, sometimes asking someone to get up and use a white board is like the old fissioned stick the interviewee on the opposite
      Message 44 of 44 , Feb 7, 2007
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        Ron Jeffries wrote:

        >Hello, William. On Wednesday, February 7, 2007, at 8:59:11 AM, you
        >wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >>If an interviewee doesn't engage in a conversation but
        >>pontificates, I'd point out explicitly that I'm looking for a
        >>directed chat and not a showoff lecture. If they fail to understand
        >>what I mean at that point (and long after explicit prefatory
        >>remarks), I have a really important piece of information about their
        >>understanding of what we do and how we do it.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >Yes. However, I'd say that the "you at the whiteboard and me and my
        >staff behind this big table" sets the situation up particularly
        >badly. "All of us around this table," with whiteboard available ...
        >and perhaps even some suitable gesturing where we all get up if the
        >interviewee gets up to go to the whiteboard ... seems to me to be
        >more likely to elicit what one wants.
        >
        >
        >
        That sums the issue up very well, sometimes asking someone to get up and
        use a white board is like the old fissioned stick the interviewee on the
        opposite side of the table to the interviewers situation.

        Some of the best pairs I have worked with have been strong introverts
        who would clam up if asked to stand up, unprepared, at a whiteboard.
        The first thing I try a gauge at an interview is whether the candidate
        is an introvert or an extrovert and tailor the process accordingly.

        Ian
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