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Advice on Submitting Paper

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  • Greg Akins
    Since there are many people on this list who have presented at conferences before, I m hoping I can get some advice. I m hoping to submit a presentation for
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 5 4:57 AM
      Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
      conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.

      I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.

      I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
      or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.

      What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
      might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
      considered?

      Any advice is greatly appreciated.

      Thanks!

      --
      ==============
      Greg Akins
      http://www.pghcodingdojo.org
      http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue
    • Victor
      ... Sorry, but I ll focus on something different. The presentation itself, assuming you get there. 1. Be aware of the time constraints. 2., 3., 4., and 5.
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 5 6:25 AM
        > What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
        > might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
        > considered?

        Sorry, but I'll focus on something different. The presentation itself,
        assuming you get there.

        1. Be aware of the time constraints.
        2., 3., 4., and 5. Practice, practice, practice, and practice.

        Recruit a friend, colleague, and family.
        Each has a different role. The colleague pays attention to the quality
        of the information delivered. Friend and family focus on how
        interesting is the presentation, more or less independently of the
        contents. These are stereotypes and reality may diverge, but these are
        your reasons to choose them. In any case, listen carefully to their
        comments. Some comments may be conflicting with other comments. It's
        up to you to decide what to accept.

        Wish you a successful presentation,
        Victor

        ===================================================

        Greg Akins wrote:
        >
        >
        > Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
        > conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.
        >
        > I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.
        >
        > I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
        > or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.
        >
        > What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
        > might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
        > considered?
        >
        > Any advice is greatly appreciated.
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > --
        > ==============
        > Greg Akins
        > http://www.pghcodingdojo.org <http://www.pghcodingdojo.org>
        > http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue
        > <http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue>
        >
        >
      • Michael Feathers
        ... Think like an audience. Ask yourself why you should care about the topic, why you would be tempted to go. Does the topic connect with a problem that you
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 5 6:58 AM
          Greg Akins wrote:

          >Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
          >conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.
          >
          >I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.
          >
          >I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
          >or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.
          >
          >What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
          >might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
          >considered?
          >
          >

          Think like an audience. Ask yourself why you should care about the
          topic, why you would be tempted to go. Does the topic connect with a
          problem that you would have as a practioner or researcher? Does it
          offer solutions or insight? Have there been other presentations on the
          same topic in the past? Ask yourself what makes yours different?

          Michael Feathers
          www.objectmentor.com
        • Greg Akins
          Thanks I m mostly worried about the submittal, rather than the presentation, because I ve done a fair number of presentations - both to customers and local
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 5 9:08 AM
            Thanks

            I'm mostly worried about the submittal, rather than the presentation,
            because I've done a fair number of presentations - both to customers
            and local user groups. Still, advice on the presentation is
            appreciated. I'm even going to Toastmasters to improve my public
            speaking.

            However, I'm acutely aware that I won't even make it to the
            presentation if I can't make a strong submission.

            So the advice regarding what to include is much appreciated.

            On 1/5/07, Michael Feathers <mfeathers@...> wrote:
            >
            >

            > Think like an audience. Ask yourself why you should care about the
            > topic, why you would be tempted to go. Does the topic connect with a
            > problem that you would have as a practioner or researcher? Does it
            > offer solutions or insight? Have there been other presentations on the
            > same topic in the past? Ask yourself what makes yours different?
            >
            > Michael Feathers
            > www.objectmentor.com
            >



            --
            ==============
            Greg Akins
            http://www.pghcodingdojo.org
            http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue
          • William Wake
            Do a Google search for accepted at OOPSLA and the top link will give you a good article which points to another too. The OOPSLA conference isn t the same as
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 5 2:14 PM
              Do a Google search for "accepted at OOPSLA" and the top link will give
              you a good article which points to another too. The OOPSLA conference
              isn't the same as the Agile conference, but I think a lot of the more
              general advice still holds.

              On 1/5/07, Greg Akins <angrygreg@...> wrote:
              > What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
              > might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
              > considered?

              A common problem I've seen is people not being clear about what their
              "thesis" is (their "one startling statement" in Kent Beck's terms),
              and what they've done to establish it.

              I'm like a lot of others seem to be - I print all the papers, give
              them a quick skim, and divide them into an A pile and a B pile. You
              really do want to get into the "A" pile, through a good topic and
              clear presentation.

              (Getting others to read your paper and critique it definitely helps.)

              Regards,
              --
              Bill Wake William.Wake@... www.xp123.com
            • John Favaro
              ... Greg, You can start with the advice given on the page of the research track on the conference web site. This is what they say: Our decision-making
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 6 1:10 AM
                > Posted by: "Greg Akins" angrygreg@... angrygreg
                > Fri Jan 5, 2007 5:06 am (PST)
                > Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
                > conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.
                >
                > I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.
                >
                > I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
                > or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.
                >
                > What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
                > might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
                > considered?
                >
                > Any advice is greatly appreciated.
                >
                > Thanks!

                Greg,

                You can start with the advice given on the page of the research track on the
                conference web site. This is what they say:

                "Our decision-making process: We are looking for original, finished
                research. To be accepted, a significant portion of the content must be new.
                The papers will undergo a scientifically rigorous peer-review. Motivation
                for research and discussion of the related work must be included. Papers
                that report on work in progress should be submitted to the
                Research-In-Progress workshop. The conference proceedings will be published
                by IEEE. Thus, all papers must follow the IEEE Proceedings Format to be
                reviewed. Papers are limited to 12 pages (no exception)."

                So you can see several points they stress here:

                - You have to show that it is new research.
                - This means you have to discuss related research, with citations, and
                highlight how what you have done is different.
                - You have to put the paper in IEEE Proceedings Format before submitting it.
                - Maximum length 12 pages.
                - They want finished research, not work in progress.

                Regarding the last point, the agile conferences have been particularly good
                at providing lots of different opportunities for people to present their
                work. Their innovation has been to have many different categories of
                presentation: experience reports, research, research in progress, poster
                sessions, etc. So one of your most important decisions is in which category
                to submit your work. Basically, the agile conferences want to hear from
                everybody so there's bound to be a category that works for you and maximizes
                the chances of your work getting a hearing. If you find you can't put
                together the submission in "finished research" mode, then submit it as
                research in progress. If you find that well, maybe it's more like
                experience, then submit it as an experience report. Look at the
                "submissions" page on the web site to get an idea of all the different
                categories they provide -- something for everybody.

                John
              • Greg Akins
                ... Oops.. hadn t even looked that far yet. Thanks! -- ============== Greg Akins http://www.pghcodingdojo.org http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 6 5:34 AM
                  On 1/6/07, John Favaro <jfavaro@...> wrote:
                  > You can start with the advice given on the page of the research track on the
                  > conference web site. This is what they say:
                  >

                  Oops.. hadn't even looked that far yet. Thanks!

                  --
                  ==============
                  Greg Akins
                  http://www.pghcodingdojo.org
                  http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue
                • Kent Beck
                  Dear Greg, As Bill Wake said, reviewers often have an A pile and a B pile and to maximize your chances of getting your paper accepted, you want it to go into
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 8 9:57 AM
                    Dear Greg,

                    As Bill Wake said, reviewers often have an A pile and a B pile and to
                    maximize your chances of getting your paper accepted, you want it to go into
                    the A pile. The most important tool for that is a clear abstract. An
                    abstract should clearly state the problem being solved, why the problem is
                    important, the conclusion of the paper, and the consequences of that
                    conclusion.

                    Another important factor for getting a paper accepted is focus. I'd much
                    rather read a paper that talked clearly about one aspect of a large project
                    than talked vaguely about all aspects. It pains me to leave topics uncovered
                    (after all, I want you to know just how very smart I am), but my papers are
                    better if I choose the most interesting topic out of a whole set.

                    An exercise I find effective is to formulate one startling sentence--pick an
                    audience and think of what is going to get them to blink their eyes and sit
                    back. This isn't an excuse to overstate your case--insincerity is a
                    paper-killer. The goal of the exercise is to be able to clearly answer the
                    reviewer's question, "Why do I care?" So, for example, the startling
                    sentence for the Implementation Patterns book is something like, "Focus on
                    communicating with other people through your code."

                    Regards,

                    Kent Beck
                    Three Rivers Institute


                    _____

                    From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Greg Akins
                    Sent: Friday, January 05, 2007 4:57 AM
                    To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [XP] Advice on Submitting Paper



                    Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
                    conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.

                    I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.

                    I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
                    or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.

                    What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
                    might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
                    considered?

                    Any advice is greatly appreciated.

                    Thanks!

                    --
                    ==============
                    Greg Akins
                    http://www.pghcodin <http://www.pghcodingdojo.org> gdojo.org
                    http://www.insomnia <http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue>
                    -consulting.org/monologue






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Chris Gardner
                    Kent, When is Implementation Patterns scheduled for release? Amazon insists it was November 3, 2006. ... go into ... problem is ... project ... uncovered ...
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 8 1:30 PM
                      Kent,

                      When is Implementation Patterns scheduled for release? Amazon insists
                      it was November 3, 2006.


                      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Kent Beck" <kentb@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dear Greg,
                      >
                      > As Bill Wake said, reviewers often have an A pile and a B pile and to
                      > maximize your chances of getting your paper accepted, you want it to
                      go into
                      > the A pile. The most important tool for that is a clear abstract. An
                      > abstract should clearly state the problem being solved, why the
                      problem is
                      > important, the conclusion of the paper, and the consequences of that
                      > conclusion.
                      >
                      > Another important factor for getting a paper accepted is focus. I'd much
                      > rather read a paper that talked clearly about one aspect of a large
                      project
                      > than talked vaguely about all aspects. It pains me to leave topics
                      uncovered
                      > (after all, I want you to know just how very smart I am), but my
                      papers are
                      > better if I choose the most interesting topic out of a whole set.
                      >
                      > An exercise I find effective is to formulate one startling
                      sentence--pick an
                      > audience and think of what is going to get them to blink their eyes
                      and sit
                      > back. This isn't an excuse to overstate your case--insincerity is a
                      > paper-killer. The goal of the exercise is to be able to clearly
                      answer the
                      > reviewer's question, "Why do I care?" So, for example, the startling
                      > sentence for the Implementation Patterns book is something like,
                      "Focus on
                      > communicating with other people through your code."
                      >
                      > Regards,
                      >
                      > Kent Beck
                      > Three Rivers Institute
                      >
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                      > [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Greg Akins
                      > Sent: Friday, January 05, 2007 4:57 AM
                      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [XP] Advice on Submitting Paper
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
                      > conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.
                      >
                      > I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.
                      >
                      > I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
                      > or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.
                      >
                      > What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
                      > might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
                      > considered?
                      >
                      > Any advice is greatly appreciated.
                      >
                      > Thanks!
                      >
                      > --
                      > ==============
                      > Greg Akins
                      > http://www.pghcodin <http://www.pghcodingdojo.org> gdojo.org
                      > http://www.insomnia <http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue>
                      > -consulting.org/monologue
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Kent Beck
                      Chris, Implementation Patterns will be out in the second quarter of this year. Regards, Kent Beck Three Rivers Institute _____ From:
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 7, 2007
                        Chris,



                        Implementation Patterns will be out in the second quarter of this year.



                        Regards,



                        Kent Beck

                        Three Rivers Institute




                        _____


                        From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                        [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Chris Gardner
                        Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 1:31 PM
                        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [XP] Advice on Submitting Paper

                        Kent,

                        When is Implementation Patterns scheduled for release? Amazon insists
                        it was November 3, 2006.

                        --- In extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        yahoogroups.com, "Kent Beck" <kentb@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Dear Greg,
                        >
                        > As Bill Wake said, reviewers often have an A pile and a B pile and to
                        > maximize your chances of getting your paper accepted, you want it to
                        go into
                        > the A pile. The most important tool for that is a clear abstract. An
                        > abstract should clearly state the problem being solved, why the
                        problem is
                        > important, the conclusion of the paper, and the consequences of that
                        > conclusion.
                        >
                        > Another important factor for getting a paper accepted is focus. I'd much
                        > rather read a paper that talked clearly about one aspect of a large
                        project
                        > than talked vaguely about all aspects. It pains me to leave topics
                        uncovered
                        > (after all, I want you to know just how very smart I am), but my
                        papers are
                        > better if I choose the most interesting topic out of a whole set.
                        >
                        > An exercise I find effective is to formulate one startling
                        sentence--pick an
                        > audience and think of what is going to get them to blink their eyes
                        and sit
                        > back. This isn't an excuse to overstate your case--insincerity is a
                        > paper-killer. The goal of the exercise is to be able to clearly
                        answer the
                        > reviewer's question, "Why do I care?" So, for example, the startling
                        > sentence for the Implementation Patterns book is something like,
                        "Focus on
                        > communicating with other people through your code."
                        >
                        > Regards,
                        >
                        > Kent Beck
                        > Three Rivers Institute
                        >
                        >
                        > _____
                        >
                        > From: extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        yahoogroups.com
                        > [mailto:extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Greg Akins
                        > Sent: Friday, January 05, 2007 4:57 AM
                        > To: extremeprogramming@ <mailto:extremeprogramming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: [XP] Advice on Submitting Paper
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Since there are many people on this list who have presented at
                        > conferences before, I'm hoping I can get some advice.
                        >
                        > I'm hoping to submit a presentation for consideration at Agile2007.
                        >
                        > I've been accumulating some research that I've done for the last year,
                        > or so. I've got an outline and an abstract.
                        >
                        > What else is useful to the "evaluators"? What kind of information
                        > might be included to make my presentation more likely to be
                        > considered?
                        >
                        > Any advice is greatly appreciated.
                        >
                        > Thanks!
                        >
                        > --
                        > ==============
                        > Greg Akins
                        > http://www.pghcodin <http://www.pghcodin <http://www.pghcodingdojo.org>
                        gdojo.org> gdojo.org
                        > http://www.insomnia <http://www.insomnia
                        <http://www.insomnia-consulting.org/monologue> -consulting.org/monologue>
                        > -consulting.org/monologue
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >





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