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Re: [XP] agile for traditional clients

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  • Ian Collins
    ... I had an interesting session with a new client last week, he wanted me to quote for a web front end to a number of document management systems. Like most
    Message 1 of 50 , Dec 2, 2006
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      Vladimir Blagojevic wrote:

      >Hi
      >
      >brief summary: how do you go about negotiating project with
      >traditionally oriented (e.g. waterfall) customer and still keeping
      >it agile? What is the best way to produce artifacts required by the
      >client (Gantt charts, reports...) without compromising the
      >principles and values of Agile development? Or in other words, how
      >can you wrap agile development in a more traditional package?
      >
      >
      >
      I had an interesting session with a new client last week, he wanted me
      to quote for a web front end to a number of document management
      systems. Like most customers, he knew he wanted every requirement, but
      wasn't able to fully define the details.

      To get an idea what he wanted, we went through each requirement and did
      a 5-10 minute mini planning game, a bit like panning for gold. At the
      end of each session, we had the essential nugget and gravel stories
      sorted. This enabled me to give a reasonable estimate of for the
      nuggets and him an idea what a minimal system could do.

      So we we turned what looked like a waterfall project into an agile one.
      While this might not be possible with all customers, it created a good
      understanding and very positive opinion of agile with this one.

      Ian
    • George Dinwiddie
      ... Yes, but we must first learn what is their problem before we suggest a solution. Otherwise we are solution-probleming rather than problem-solving. See
      Message 50 of 50 , Dec 6, 2006
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        Scott Ambler wrote:
        > Agile is a solution. To convince an organization to "go agile" they
        > need to recognize that it solves a problem.

        Yes, but we must first learn what is their problem before we suggest a
        solution. Otherwise we are solution-probleming rather than
        problem-solving. See "Are Your Lights On?: How to Figure Out What the
        Problem Really Is" by Donald C. Gause and Gerald M. Weinberg.

        - George


        --
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
        * George Dinwiddie * gdinwiddie@...
        Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
        Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
        ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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