Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

What's up with Rails?

Expand Messages
  • Phlip
    Extremists: When this mailing list started, some very peculiar ideas were afloat: - Test-first makes dynamic typing more productive than static typing - line
    Message 1 of 55 , Nov 29, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Extremists:

      When this mailing list started, some very peculiar ideas were afloat:

      - Test-first makes dynamic typing more productive
      than static typing

      - line count is not productivity

      - agility and velocity make a major competitive advantage

      So a kind of prediction, or prophecy, was in the air: The future belonged to
      some lean and agile system. It would arise and outcompete the overgrown
      corporate BDUF offerings.

      This summer, Ruby on Rails emerged as a leading "alternative" web platform.
      Ruby found its killer app. More than Amazon have jumped on the bandwagon:

      http://weblog.rubyonrails.com/2006/11/29/amazon-goes-ruby-on-rails

      "Coming shortly, we'll have a bunch of other announcements for high-profile
      companies going Ruby on Rails for various new projects. Exciting times."

      Rails is a "Post-Agile" offering. It comes with systems, similar to
      Eclipse's, that allow programmers to submit patches. These can either
      stand-alone as plugins, or be rolled into the Rails core.

      And Rails was invented using Test Driven Development. It admirably
      demonstrates, using "Convention over Configuration", how "duck typing" and
      TDD can do more with less.

      --
      Phlip
      http://www.greencheese.us/ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!
    • Kent Beck
      Charlie, Having coined the phrase, I can speak with a fair amount of certainty that test-first has always been a part of TDD. When I first started writing
      Message 55 of 55 , Jan 12, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Charlie,

        Having coined the phrase, I can speak with a fair amount of certainty that
        test-first has always been a part of TDD. When I first started writing tests
        first, I focused on that aspect. When I started writing the TDD book, I
        realized that what I did was really the combination of test-first and
        incremental design, and that either component technique could be used on its
        own.

        Regards,

        Kent Beck
        Three Rivers Institute


        _____

        From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charlie Poole
        Sent: Tuesday, January 09, 2007 3:11 PM
        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [XP] Re: What's up with Rails?



        > > >using automated tests to drive all aspects of development, at all
        > > >scales.
        >
        > Not so many years ago, the term TDD didn't necessarily imply
        > "test- first". Fortunately, like other agile concepts and
        > practices, ideas about just what TDD "is" have evolved over
        > time. Today, TDD implies test-first. There is no need to
        > invent another TLA to describe test- first development.

        Interesting... In my own personal experience, I've only run into
        the notion of TDD without doing the tests first fairly recently,
        as an error in interpretation on the part of those who weren't
        around when TDD grew - as I believe it did - out of test-first.

        As a matter of historical curiosity, I'd love to see some
        examples of the early use of TDD without "firstness"

        Charlie







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.