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Re: [XP] [OT] Ruby

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  • Georg Tuparev
    I know I am late with this replay. It is also true, that it does not happen often I disagree with Andrew (first time - perhaps). Also, must say that I like
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 2, 2006
      I know I am late with this replay. It is also true, that it does not
      happen often I disagree with Andrew (first time - perhaps).

      Also, must say that I like ruby and we do our workflow engine using
      it. But it is unfair to explain the superiority of one language based
      on the fact that other languages were used to write crap frameworks!

      My own conceptually different replacement of log4j is written in
      Objective-C and it has only one third of the lines of the Ruby
      version. Does it mean Objective-C is better? And, yes, I believe ObjC
      is for many things better choice, but also for many - not - as Andy
      writes. But in this particular case the problem is with log4j and not
      the language.

      Similar cases:
      - the entire J2EE madness.
      - Rails ( compare it with the Java based WebObjects and you will see
      how over-hyped Rails is)

      just my €0.02

      g

      On Sep 7, 2006, at 3:10 AM, Andrew Hunt wrote:

      >> An order of magnitude fewer lines?? You just can't claim different
      >> coding styles or extra comments...
      >
      > And it's not just lines-of-code; take a look at Justin Gehtland's
      > experience of redoing a large J2EE endeavor in Rails in a fraction of
      > the time. A small fraction, in fact.
      >
      > Bruce Tate makes many of these points and more in his "From Java to
      > Ruby" book (disclaimer: yeah, we publish that one. I may well be
      > biased.) If you're looking for ammunition for an impassioned
      > argument, or just some personal motivation, his book is a fun read.

      -- georg --

      "War is God's way of teaching Americans about geography."
      Ambrose Bierce, writer (1842-1914)
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