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Re: [XP] [ANN] OOPLSA Tutorial: Storytelling with FIT.

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  • Steve Freeman
    ... Sure. The idea is to concentrate on the communication aspect of FIT Documents, rather than the implementing technology -- although we did touch on that
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2006
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      On 27 Sep 2006, at 04:50, James Carr wrote:
      > Anyhow, what will you be focusing on the most? One challange that I
      > have
      > been consistently working with is to have a stronger collaboration
      > with our
      > customers. Sometimes we just have them give us a "test matrix" of
      > criteria
      > they want tested, get to work on it, and make it pass. However,
      > sometimes we
      > don't get them involved enough, and that's one thing I would love
      > to do.
      >
      > I'd really be interested in perhaps seeing how to get the customer
      > to write
      > the tests with us, kind of do a "pair programming" team up with them,
      > letting them write the FIT tables and documentation during
      > discussion with
      > them, and either use existing fixtures or try to whip fixture code up
      > quickly for them during the session. :)
      >
      > I'd like to hear what you have to say on this... but don't give me
      > the full
      > presentation just yet. ;)

      Sure. The idea is to concentrate on the communication aspect of FIT
      Documents, rather than the implementing technology -- although we did
      touch on that last time because it was a small audience and that's
      what interested them. We have an exercise where we try to make people
      see a document they've written from the point of view of someone
      who's not been involved. It usually flushes out some interesting
      insights. In between, we also talk about the basics of FIT and show
      some examples from projects we've worked on.

      On the project Mike and I worked on, it took a long time to get some
      of the analysts (it was a system-to-system service, not much front
      end) to see our point, rather than writing text documents, but in the
      end they really bought into it. The most frustrating and valuable
      episodes were when we ended up going round and round on some document
      trying to flush out quite what they wanted.

      S.

      Steve Freeman
      M3P Limited.
      http://www.m3p.co.uk

      Winner of the Agile Alliance Gordon Pask award 2006
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