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Re: [TDD] Good Periodicals?

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  • Jean Tessier
    I was a big fan of Software Development Magazine. I was very sad when I learned they were going away. I ll give Dr. Dobbs a chance to see if they can pick up
    Message 1 of 16 , May 31 8:46 PM
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      I was a big fan of Software Development Magazine. I was very sad when I
      learned they were going away. I'll give Dr. Dobbs a chance to see if they
      can pick up some of the pieces. Though, frankly, I was a little less
      impressed with SD the last 15 months. They had been slacking off. I used
      to keep track of those articles I deemed "so fundamental everyone I know
      should read this" and I would get at least one per month for the longest
      time. But I couldn't quite find any in the past year or so.

      For now, I don't know what else to read instead.

      Jean.


      On 5/31/06, John Carter <john.carter@...> wrote:
      >
      > Two important periodicals have recently bit the dust.
      >
      > The venerable C Users Journal and the Software Development magazine.
      >
      > Both have quietly folded themselves into Dr Dobbs.
      >
      > Question for the Group:
      >
      > Which periodicals do you regard as important reads for Software
      > Development professionals?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > John Carter Phone : (64)(3) 358 6639
      > Tait Electronics Fax : (64)(3) 359 4632
      > PO Box 1645 Christchurch Email : john.carter@...
      > New Zealand
      >
      > Carter's Clarification of Murphy's Law.
      >
      > "Things only ever go right so that they may go more spectacularly wrong
      > later."
      >
      > From this principle, all of life and physics may be deduced.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tony Byrne
      Hello John, Wednesday, May 31, 2006, 11:53:08 PM, you wrote: JC Which periodicals do you regard as important reads for Software JC Development professionals?
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 1, 2006
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        Hello John,

        Wednesday, May 31, 2006, 11:53:08 PM, you wrote:

        JC> Which periodicals do you regard as important reads for Software
        JC> Development professionals?

        It may be just me (though I suspect not :-), but I think Internet has
        really changed the way software developers do their important
        'reading'. The bulk of my own reading on the subject comes from
        mailing lists such as this one, and the blogs and articles that the
        contributors to the lists link to. I also read many software
        development books and again the Internet is my main source of
        information / reviews for these.

        I don't lament the switch-over either. I used to subscribe to Software
        Development, but I found very little in any given issue that was
        compelling reading and I discontinued my subscription after a year.

        Regards,

        Tony.

        --
        Tony Byrne
      • Ron Jeffries
        ... JC Which periodicals do you regard as important reads for Software JC Development professionals? I still read and enjoy Dr Dobbs, primarily due to
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 1, 2006
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          On Thursday, June 1, 2006, at 4:34:31 AM, Tony Byrne wrote:

          > Wednesday, May 31, 2006, 11:53:08 PM, you wrote:

          JC>> Which periodicals do you regard as important reads for Software
          JC>> Development professionals?

          I still read and enjoy Dr Dobbs, primarily due to Michael Swaine.
          His article this past issue, about Ruby on Rails, is a keeper, for
          example.

          I get Better Software, which is mostly OK. ACM Queue, slightly
          interesting. Communications of the ACM, kind of broadening but never
          practical. IEEE Software, sometimes something interesting but Martin
          Fowler's influence seems to have worn off, and it's less so.

          PC Magazine still has some interesting stuff.

          > It may be just me (though I suspect not :-), but I think Internet has
          > really changed the way software developers do their important
          > 'reading'. The bulk of my own reading on the subject comes from
          > mailing lists such as this one, and the blogs and articles that the
          > contributors to the lists link to. I also read many software
          > development books and again the Internet is my main source of
          > information / reviews for these.

          > I don't lament the switch-over either. I used to subscribe to Software
          > Development, but I found very little in any given issue that was
          > compelling reading and I discontinued my subscription after a year.

          It's hard to track all the blogs one "should", and there's a lot of
          dross even among the best.

          But as I reflect on the remarks in Tony's post, and similar ones in
          the thread, I can see the same trend in myself. A lot of these
          things I subscribe to just because I feel that I "should", not
          because they're helping me much.

          I'm with Tony on books, as well. When someone mentions a book on one
          of the lists or a blog, I click it up and if it looks at all
          interesting, I buy it. They're all tax deductible if you itemize,
          too. Books good. Periodicals, not so much.

          Ron Jeffries
          www.XProgramming.com
          No one expects the Spanish Inquisition ...
        • Tony Byrne
          Hello Ron, Thursday, June 1, 2006, 10:18:18 AM, you wrote: RJ I m with Tony on books, as well. When someone mentions a book on one RJ of the lists or a blog,
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 1, 2006
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            Hello Ron,

            Thursday, June 1, 2006, 10:18:18 AM, you wrote:

            RJ> I'm with Tony on books, as well. When someone mentions a book on one
            RJ> of the lists or a blog, I click it up and if it looks at all
            RJ> interesting, I buy it.

            Amazon.com et al have a lot to answer for. I've run out of shelf space
            in my house for my collection of technical books. :-)

            I don't think I'd be the developer I am today if it weren't for the
            access to quality material that the Internet affords me. Sure there is
            also plenty of dross out there, but the abundance of critique helps me
            to sift the good stuff from the bad. For me, the Internet has been far
            more useful as a medium for learning than any of the periodicals that
            I've picked up.

            I also wonder if I'd ever have come across agile development and XP in
            particular, if it weren't for the Internet. It's probably safe to say
            that the Internet has helped agile development gain the penetration
            that it has. Unlike 'big processes' which have plenty of marketing
            dollars and tool vendors pushing them, XP and agile development in
            general always struck me as being grass roots driven by the folks in
            the trenches. Without the Internet how would the world at large have
            heard about the movement. Certainly, the periodicals have lagged
            behind the Internet as a source of agile development learning.

            Regards,

            Tony.

            --
            Tony Byrne
          • Phlip
            ... Could it be the editors neglect feedback? -- Phlip http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 1, 2006
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              Ron Jeffries wrote:

              > I get Better Software, which is mostly OK. ACM Queue, slightly
              > interesting. Communications of the ACM, kind of broadening but never
              > practical. IEEE Software, sometimes something interesting but Martin
              > Fowler's influence seems to have worn off, and it's less so.

              Could it be the editors neglect feedback?

              --
              Phlip
              http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!
            • Larry Brunelle
              ... It was a sad day when CMP thought they needed to kill C/C++ Users Journal and then Software Development in favor of the relatively valueless CRM they
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 1, 2006
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                John Carter wrote:
                > Two important periodicals have recently bit the dust.
                >
                > The venerable C Users Journal and the Software Development magazine.
                >
                > Both have quietly folded themselves into Dr Dobbs.
                >
                > Question for the Group:
                >
                > Which periodicals do you regard as important reads for Software
                > Development professionals?

                It was a sad day when CMP thought they needed to kill
                C/C++ Users Journal and then Software Development in
                favor of the relatively valueless CRM they continue
                to send me (unasked-for, as far as memory serves).
                Dr. Dobbs has value to me only in respect of the
                items it continues from SD and the Journal; not
                impressed and never have been.

                However, Computerworld provides better journalistic
                coverage of the professional landscape than most.
                CACM and IEEE Computer are close to necessary, and
                Queue and IEEE Privacy & Security provide coverage
                on emerging issues that have pervasive impact.

                I personally value highly Sys Admin and Linux
                Journal, but that depends on your platform.
                For those who also will miss C/C++ Users Journal,
                do make sure you have all of Scott Meyers's books
                on your shelf.
              • John Carter
                ... I tell you what would work as a new journal business model... The paper version is just something to keep in the library, to read in bed, to drop on a
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 5, 2006
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                  On Thu, 1 Jun 2006, Phlip wrote:

                  > Could it be the editors neglect feedback?

                  I tell you what would work as a new journal business model...

                  The paper version is just something to keep in the library, to read in
                  bed, to drop on a colleagues desk, it's a convenience.

                  People will pay something for the convenience.

                  Editor's should contract writers to openly publish early drafts on the
                  journals website and invite feedback in openly accessible web forums
                  from the general public.

                  They may derive some advertising revenue from the website.

                  After a month or two, the writer rewrites the article incorporating the
                  feed back and the editor paper publishes it.

                  In the mean time, I will go for books. Especially openly developed books.


                  John Carter Phone : (64)(3) 358 6639
                  Tait Electronics Fax : (64)(3) 359 4632
                  PO Box 1645 Christchurch Email : john.carter@...
                  New Zealand

                  Carter's Clarification of Murphy's Law.

                  "Things only ever go right so that they may go more spectacularly wrong later."

                  From this principle, all of life and physics may be deduced.
                • Ron Jeffries
                  ... I m not exactly sure what an openly developed book is, so please say more about such a thing. I posted draft copies of most of the chapters of
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 6, 2006
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                    On Monday, June 5, 2006, at 7:28:22 PM, John Carter wrote:

                    > In the mean time, I will go for books. Especially openly developed books.

                    I'm not exactly sure what an "openly developed book" is, so please
                    say more about such a thing.

                    I posted draft copies of most of the chapters of /Adventures in C#/
                    on my web site, up until about the last 1/3 of the book. The
                    publisher asked me to stop because it would interfere with book
                    sales. And I don't think that was unique to that particular
                    publisher, based on conversations with others.

                    Even I, who have a special arrangement with Amazon whereby if I
                    think about a book they send it to me and charge my credit card,
                    wonder whether I'd buy a book all of which was up on the Web ...

                    Ron Jeffries
                    www.XProgramming.com
                    If we're not shipping our software when it's ready,
                    it's poor business practice.
                    If we're not sure whether our software is ready,
                    it's poor software practice.
                    http://www.xprogramming.com/blog/Page.aspx?display=FrequentReleases
                  • yahoogroups@jhrothjr.com
                    From: Ron Jeffries To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 6, 2006
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                      From: "Ron Jeffries"
                      <ronjeffries.at.XProgramming.com@...>
                      To: "extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com"
                      <extremeprogramming.at.yahoogroups.com@...>
                      Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2006 3:31 AM
                      Subject: Re: [XP] Good Periodicals?


                      > On Monday, June 5, 2006, at 7:28:22 PM, John Carter wrote:
                      >
                      >> In the mean time, I will go for books. Especially openly developed books.
                      >
                      > I'm not exactly sure what an "openly developed book" is, so please
                      > say more about such a thing.
                      >
                      > I posted draft copies of most of the chapters of /Adventures in C#/
                      > on my web site, up until about the last 1/3 of the book. The
                      > publisher asked me to stop because it would interfere with book
                      > sales. And I don't think that was unique to that particular
                      > publisher, based on conversations with others.
                      >
                      > Even I, who have a special arrangement with Amazon whereby if I
                      > think about a book they send it to me and charge my credit card,
                      > wonder whether I'd buy a book all of which was up on the Web ...

                      Whether you'd do that is something only you know, but lots of
                      people do. Witness the Baen Free Library, especially Eric Flint's
                      comments on his (and others) revenue after posting free copies
                      of books. Of course, series science fiction is a completely different
                      domain than computer technical.

                      John Roth


                      >
                      > Ron Jeffries
                      > www.XProgramming.com
                      > If we're not shipping our software when it's ready,
                      > it's poor business practice.
                      > If we're not sure whether our software is ready,
                      > it's poor software practice.
                      > http://www.xprogramming.com/blog/Page.aspx?display=FrequentReleases
                      >
                      >
                    • Larry Brunelle
                      Ron Jeffries wrote: [clip] ... FWIW, I just happen to notice that I did this very thing within the last couple of weeks: I purchased the O Reilly edition of
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 6, 2006
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                        Ron Jeffries wrote:
                        [clip]

                        > Even I, who have a special arrangement with Amazon whereby if I
                        > think about a book they send it to me and charge my credit card,
                        > wonder whether I'd buy a book all of which was up on the Web ...

                        FWIW, I just happen to notice that I did this very thing within
                        the last couple of weeks: I purchased the O'Reilly edition of
                        the Subversion manual. This publication is available freely on
                        the web, and in a more recent version to boot.

                        Why, then, buy it?
                        1. I want a reference on my desk. I have a screen that shows a
                        choice of about 10 desktops and maybe 20 or so windows. I
                        don't want yet another which would require me switching
                        back and forth as I type in some syntax after (but not from)
                        the manual.
                        2. I can read the dang thing where and when I want to, even
                        during a power failure. Even on a train, if that was how
                        I was getting to work (well, maybe).
                        3. I can page back and forth in a book far better than the same
                        document online.
                        4. Were I to need someone else to be informed by it, I could
                        lend or give a copy. Passing the link works well sometimes,
                        but not all.
                        5. Printing out an online copy puts me in some instance of the
                        bookbinding business, at which I do not excel O'Reilly.
                        6. The price was not so high as to give me pause. (As a data
                        point for anyone who cares, I perceive the value to me of
                        producing a document as a book to be between $5.00 and about
                        $25.00, depending on the contents and my desire to use those
                        contents in book form - but not accounting for the value of
                        the contents alone.)

                        Also, and this is especially true for books by the likes of,
                        say, Ron, Scott Meyers, or Jennifer Niederst Robbins, sometimes
                        a nicely-bound book is simply a nice gift for a friend or
                        a colleague. A URL lacks a certain something for this purpose.

                        All that said, every sale lost is, well, a sale lost.
                      • Anthony Moralez
                        ... While as open as /Adventures in C#/, the Pragmatic Bookshelf s Beta Book program[1] is what I thought of when I read John s comment. Anthony [1]
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 6, 2006
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                          On 6/6/06, Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...> wrote:
                          > On Monday, June 5, 2006, at 7:28:22 PM, John Carter wrote:
                          >
                          > > In the mean time, I will go for books. Especially openly developed books.
                          >
                          >
                          > I'm not exactly sure what an "openly developed book" is, so please
                          > say more about such a thing.

                          While as "open" as /Adventures in C#/, the Pragmatic Bookshelf's Beta
                          Book program[1] is what I thought of when I read John's comment.

                          Anthony

                          [1] http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/starter_kit/faqs/beta_faq.html
                        • Donald Roby
                          ... developed books. ... If I m sufficiently impressed with something online, I tend to want a paper copy even if I ve managed to read the whole thing. I read
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 6, 2006
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                            --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, yahoogroups@... wrote:
                            >
                            > From: "Ron Jeffries"
                            > <ronjeffries.at.XProgramming.com@...>
                            > To: "extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com"
                            > <extremeprogramming.at.yahoogroups.com@...>
                            > Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2006 3:31 AM
                            > Subject: Re: [XP] Good Periodicals?
                            >
                            >
                            > > On Monday, June 5, 2006, at 7:28:22 PM, John Carter wrote:
                            > >
                            > >> In the mean time, I will go for books. Especially openly
                            developed books.
                            > >
                            > > I'm not exactly sure what an "openly developed book" is, so please
                            > > say more about such a thing.
                            > >
                            > > I posted draft copies of most of the chapters of /Adventures in C#/
                            > > on my web site, up until about the last 1/3 of the book. The
                            > > publisher asked me to stop because it would interfere with book
                            > > sales. And I don't think that was unique to that particular
                            > > publisher, based on conversations with others.
                            > >
                            > > Even I, who have a special arrangement with Amazon whereby if I
                            > > think about a book they send it to me and charge my credit card,
                            > > wonder whether I'd buy a book all of which was up on the Web ...
                            >
                            > Whether you'd do that is something only you know, but lots of
                            > people do. Witness the Baen Free Library, especially Eric Flint's
                            > comments on his (and others) revenue after posting free copies
                            > of books. Of course, series science fiction is a completely different
                            > domain than computer technical.
                            >
                            > John Roth
                            >
                            >
                            If I'm sufficiently impressed with something online, I tend to want a
                            paper copy even if I've managed to read the whole thing.

                            I read all of the draft of the 2nd edition "Deathmarch" online and
                            then bought it immediately when it was available. I also read many
                            draft chapters of "Working Effectively With Legacy Code" online before
                            buying it (watching the yahoo group where Michael was posting drafts),
                            and would definitely have bought this one even if the entire book were
                            online.
                          • George Dinwiddie
                            ... I did the same with WELC, and would have done the same with Lean Software Development had I not won a copy as a door prize. But there have been online
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jun 7, 2006
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                              Donald Roby wrote:
                              > I read all of the draft of the 2nd edition "Deathmarch" online and
                              > then bought it immediately when it was available. I also read many
                              > draft chapters of "Working Effectively With Legacy Code" online before
                              > buying it (watching the yahoo group where Michael was posting drafts),
                              > and would definitely have bought this one even if the entire book were
                              > online.

                              I did the same with WELC, and would have done the same with Lean
                              Software Development had I not won a copy as a door prize. But there
                              have been online books that made me want to avoid them, too. It seems
                              to me that only *good* books can increase their sales by making some or
                              all available.

                              - George


                              --
                              ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                              * George Dinwiddie * gdinwiddie@...
                              Software Development http://www.idiacomputing.com
                              Consultant and Coach http://www.agilemaryland.org
                              ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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