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Re: [XP] Authoring Use Cases - tools

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  • Paul Klipp
    That s exactly what we do, using Fitness where appropriate, but I feel more comfortable with use cases or user stories as a first step, as do most of my
    Message 1 of 3 , May 7 8:29 AM
      That's exactly what we do, using Fitness where appropriate, but I
      feel more comfortable with use cases or user stories as a first step,
      as do most of my clients.

      Paul


      On 2006-05-07, at 16:49, Steven Gordon wrote:

      > You should consider writing acceptance tests (perhaps in Fitness)
      > instead of writing prose use cases.
      >
      > Acceptance tests should more or less contain the same information, but
      > they are unambiguous and much less wasteful (since the use cases
      > should be eventually translated into automated acceptance tests
      > anyway).
      >
      > Steven Gordon
      >
      > On 5/7/06, Paul Klipp <paul@...> wrote:
      >> I've recently discovered the user stories I've been using for initial
      >> requirements gathering are insufficient for some remote clients who
      >> tend to be less communicative during development. Inspired by
      >> Alistair Cockburn's excellent book, I've started writing prose use
      >> cases in collaboration with one of these clients. Since they don't
      >> fit on an index card and tools like XPlanner are ill-suited to
      >> capture detail, I had to look for another way to collect them. I've
      >> used wiki's before, and many customers don't respond well to them. If
      >> they do use one, it takes a lot of effort to keep the data structured
      >> on it. I don't like the idea of use cases existing in one big list in
      >> an Open Office document because it would be difficult to reference
      >> and would start to become cumbersome.
      >>
      >> I recently settled on TreePad (www.treepad.com). I use the top level
      >> for summary cases with user goals as subordinate cases and sub-
      >> function cases subordinate to those. I can see where this structure
      >> wouldn't always work as a set of use cases don't necessarily follow a
      >> hierarchical structure, but I've adapted to that fact by organizing
      >> them as seems logical to me and noting links that exist to other
      >> parts of the hierarchy.
      >>
      >> I reason I am writing is to ask if anyone has tried this approach and
      >> can offer advice or warnings before I get to married to it or if
      >> anyone in a similar position can recommend a better way of collecting
      >> and referencing use cases.
      >>
      >> One very nice thing about TreePad is that it exports to XML, as well
      >> as to text and html.
      >>
      >> So, any comments or advice?
      >>
      >> Paul
      >>
      >>
      >> ___________________________
      >> Paul Klipp, President
      >> Lunar Logic Polska, Sp. z o.o.
      >>
      >> +48 (12) 293-4376
      >> +48 (12) 293-4375 (fax)
      >>
      >> icq: 64230264
      >> Y!: paulklipp
      >> Skype: paulklipp
      >
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      ___________________________
      Paul Klipp, President
      Lunar Logic Polska, Sp. z o.o.

      +48 (12) 293-4376
      +48 (12) 293-4375 (fax)

      icq: 64230264
      Y!: paulklipp
      Skype: paulklipp
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