Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Pair Programming as an interview...

Expand Messages
  • geoffrey_slinker
    ... First, Ken its good to see your alive and well. I haven t noticed many posts from you. Compatibility is extremely important. Here is a snippet from one of
    Message 1 of 49 , Feb 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Boucher" <yahoo@n...>
      wrote:
      >
      > > What are people looking for when they want to experience someone
      > > pairing?
      >
      > I'm looking for the following:
      > 1) Compatibility

      First, Ken its good to see your alive and well. I haven't noticed
      many posts from you.

      Compatibility is extremely important.

      Here is a snippet from one of my rants:

      Consider the Person
      The first thing you need to consider is the person. That is what you
      are hiring. The computer scientist is more than just a brain with
      hands that can type. Finding a person that fits the company culture
      is extremely important. Consider this analogy of buying a pure-bred
      show dog. Let's consider one of my favorite breeds the Australian
      Shepherd. You want a dog to win best in breed and in agility trials.
      You have a choice of a dog that does not meet the breed standard and
      is completely trained in the agility course and a dog that is near
      ideal to the breed standard but has not been trained in the agility
      course. These are your only two choices. Which dog do you buy? The
      dog that fits the standard because you can take the chance on
      training it in the agility course. The other dog can not change its
      looks. If you have a candidate for employment that is extremely
      talented but does not fit in or work well with others and you have a
      candidate that works well with others but lacks experience which do
      you hire? I would say the one that works well with others. If it is
      an out-sourced contract position this analogy will not be as
      pertinent.



      Note: I do believe people can change.

      Geoff
    • whojgalt04
      ... could ... candidate ... It wasn t pair programming, but in the last job I had, I later found my interview test code in the production system. I looked at
      Message 49 of 49 , Feb 7, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Larry Brunelle
        <brunelle@...> wrote:
        >
        > Steven Gordon wrote:
        > > I wonder how much of the code produced by pairing with candidates
        could
        > > actually be leveraged. Would there be an obligation to pay the
        candidate
        > > for an hour of work if the code developed in the pairing session was
        > > actually used?

        > o Regardless of good faith, who DOES own that code?


        It wasn't pair programming, but in the last job I had, I later found
        my interview test code in the production system. I looked at it as a
        compliment, but it did strike me a little off, and I still joke about
        how they used me...

        I'd say that the upstanding way to do it is that the test code is
        destroyed, except for maybe a printed copy in the employee's file, and
        if he is hired, then he can do it again "for real" once on the job if
        needed. It just avoids any misunderstandings or temptations that way.

        --Kyle Bennett
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.