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Re: Hiring : was Re: [XP] The amazing misunderstanding of XP

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  • glbrown@inebraska.com
    ... It really isn t a problem. The teams have learned to speak softly when pairing. Larger team discussions usually move to a conference room. We also have a
    Message 1 of 49 , Jan 30, 2006
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      Quoting Luiz Esmiralha <esmiralha@...>:

      > On 1/30/06, glbrown@... <glbrown@...> wrote:
      > > Here is how our interview process goes:
      > >
      > > 6. Pairing in with one or two XP teams
      > >
      > > Step 6 is mostly about letting the candidate learn about us and what it is
      > like
      > > to work in a large open space with 5 XP teams. We get rarely get any value
      > > from the pairing session.
      > >
      >
      > Gary,
      >
      > How is it like having 5 XP teams in the same work area? How do you
      > manage to keep the noise level acceptable?
      > I ask because I worked in a place where unrelated teams were bundled
      > together in a large place much like a newspaper room and, in this
      > particular case, the noise level was almost unbearable.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Luiz

      It really isn't a problem. The teams have learned to speak softly when pairing.
      Larger team discussions usually move to a conference room. We also have a
      white noise generator. The feeling in the room is more energized, than moisy.

      GB.



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    • whojgalt04
      ... could ... candidate ... It wasn t pair programming, but in the last job I had, I later found my interview test code in the production system. I looked at
      Message 49 of 49 , Feb 7, 2006
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        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, Larry Brunelle
        <brunelle@...> wrote:
        >
        > Steven Gordon wrote:
        > > I wonder how much of the code produced by pairing with candidates
        could
        > > actually be leveraged. Would there be an obligation to pay the
        candidate
        > > for an hour of work if the code developed in the pairing session was
        > > actually used?

        > o Regardless of good faith, who DOES own that code?


        It wasn't pair programming, but in the last job I had, I later found
        my interview test code in the production system. I looked at it as a
        compliment, but it did strike me a little off, and I still joke about
        how they used me...

        I'd say that the upstanding way to do it is that the test code is
        destroyed, except for maybe a printed copy in the employee's file, and
        if he is hired, then he can do it again "for real" once on the job if
        needed. It just avoids any misunderstandings or temptations that way.

        --Kyle Bennett
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