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Free Developer: just submit your user story or give me your code tests ANN]

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  • Hugo Garcia
    Hi I am accepting any user story that you may need written in Java. I also can build GUI s especially in Eclipse. If you do not have any code for me then just
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 25, 2006
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      Hi

      I am accepting any user story that you may need written in Java. I
      also can build GUI's especially in Eclipse. If you do not have any
      code for me then just send me one of your code tests and that will
      keep me busy. Remeber this is all FREE!

      thanks

      -H
    • Hugo Garcia
      All code submitted with be Fit and Unit tested. -H
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 25, 2006
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        All code submitted with be Fit and Unit tested.

        -H

        On 1/25/06, Hugo Garcia <hugo.a.garcia@...> wrote:
        > Hi
        >
        > I am accepting any user story that you may need written in Java. I
        > also can build GUI's especially in Eclipse. If you do not have any
        > code for me then just send me one of your code tests and that will
        > keep me busy. Remeber this is all FREE!
        >
        > thanks
        >
        > -H
        >
      • Jeff Langr
        Greetings Hugo, Wow, that s pretty cool. Here s something: In Eclipse, when you do an assertEquals and compare a string to a string, the JUnit plugin gives you
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 25, 2006
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          Greetings Hugo,

          Wow, that's pretty cool.

          Here's something: In Eclipse, when you do an assertEquals and compare a
          string to a string, the JUnit plugin gives you an opportunity to
          "Compare Actual With Expected Test Result." This brings up a nice dialog
          that shows the expected string to the left and actual string to the
          right. It highlights (in red) the characters that are different.

          While this is usually much better than the default JUnit GUI behavior
          (which shows something like "expected <...xx...> but was <...yy...>"),
          when you have longer strings that fail comparison, it can be difficult
          to figure out just where the problem is.

          One thing I've wanted to do but haven't found the time (I don't know SWT
          really, either) is to rework that dialog.

          The story: Put the expected string immediately *above* the actual
          string, display both in a non-proportional font, synchronize scrolling.
          Get it into the next drop of Eclipse (I have no idea how this happens).

          Optional story: add a next/previous button and corresponding hotkey that
          navigates between all difference in the string.

          -Jeff-

          Hugo Garcia wrote:

          >Hi
          >
          >I am accepting any user story that you may need written in Java. I
          >also can build GUI's especially in Eclipse. If you do not have any
          >code for me then just send me one of your code tests and that will
          >keep me busy. Remeber this is all FREE!
          >
          >

          --
          Langr Software Solutions
          http://langrsoft.com
          author, Agile Java: Crafting Code With Test-Driven Development
        • Hugo Garcia
          ... The Bad News: The Dialog cannot be reworked without some major rewrite of the underlying widgets used to impelement it. The Good News: We can build a
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 26, 2006
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            > One thing I've wanted to do but haven't found the time (I don't know SWT
            > really, either) is to rework that dialog.

            The Bad News: The Dialog cannot be reworked without some major rewrite
            of the underlying widgets used to impelement it.

            The Good News: We can build a custom StringComparator. It would be
            activated via our own menu contribution to the JUnit view menu. When a
            user selects the menu then it would bring up our dialog.

            >
            > The story: Put the expected string immediately *above* the actual
            > string, display both in a non-proportional font, synchronize scrolling.
            > Get it into the next drop of Eclipse (I have no idea how this happens).

            Estimate: I've spiked a solution and it shoul take me two days to
            finish it. You can see the spike and comment on it at my blog as
            soon as blogger works again.

            The implemetation depends on an internal API but for purposes it it
            ok. We will open a bug report at Eclipse and hopefully they will make
            the API public by next release.

            >
            > Optional story: add a next/previous button and corresponding hotkey that
            > navigates between all difference in the string.

            We can do this one as the next story?

            -H
          • Jeff Langr
            Sounds exciting. Let me know how you want me to get involved. I m particularly curious about your experiences in getting stuff incorporated into Eclipse.
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 26, 2006
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              Sounds exciting. Let me know how you want me to get involved. I'm
              particularly curious about your experiences in getting stuff
              incorporated into Eclipse.

              thanks,
              Jeff

              Hugo Garcia wrote:

              >>One thing I've wanted to do but haven't found the time (I don't know SWT
              >>really, either) is to rework that dialog.
              >>
              >>
              >
              >The Bad News: The Dialog cannot be reworked without some major rewrite
              >of the underlying widgets used to impelement it.
              >
              >The Good News: We can build a custom StringComparator. It would be
              >activated via our own menu contribution to the JUnit view menu. When a
              >user selects the menu then it would bring up our dialog.
              >
              >
              >
              >>The story: Put the expected string immediately *above* the actual
              >>string, display both in a non-proportional font, synchronize scrolling.
              >>Get it into the next drop of Eclipse (I have no idea how this happens).
              >>
              >>
              >
              >Estimate: I've spiked a solution and it shoul take me two days to
              >finish it. You can see the spike and comment on it at my blog as
              >soon as blogger works again.
              >
              >The implemetation depends on an internal API but for purposes it it
              >ok. We will open a bug report at Eclipse and hopefully they will make
              >the API public by next release.
              >
              >

              --
              Langr Software Solutions
              http://langrsoft.com
              author, Agile Java: Crafting Code With Test-Driven Development
            • Hugo Garcia
              ... Well... you are the Customer of course :) I have updated my blog at http://oogo.blogspot.com/ To everyone: Please feel free to send me user stories and/or
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 26, 2006
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                On 1/26/06, Jeff Langr <jeff@...> wrote:
                > Sounds exciting. Let me know how you want me to get involved. I'm
                > particularly curious about your experiences in getting stuff
                > incorporated into Eclipse.

                Well... you are the Customer of course :)

                I have updated my blog at http://oogo.blogspot.com/

                To everyone:

                Please feel free to send me user stories and/or coding problems/tests.

                thanks
              • Piergiuliano Bossi
                ... Hello Hugo, I think this is a very interesting experiment. Or whatever you wanna call it: how do you consider it? Another question is: I m taken for
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 26, 2006
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                  On 1/27/06, Hugo Garcia <hugo.a.garcia@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Please feel free to send me user stories and/or coding problems/tests.
                  >

                  Hello Hugo,

                  I think this is a very interesting experiment. Or whatever you wanna call
                  it: how do you consider it?

                  Another question is: I'm taken for granted that you are going to implement
                  only OSS (or the like) and keep everything public, but am I wrong?

                  Nice stuff.
                  Giuliano


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Hugo Garcia
                  ... This is just what I do. I like to code and I would like to contribute where possible. Actually, it would be interesting if we could have a public
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 27, 2006
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                    > Hello Hugo,
                    >
                    > I think this is a very interesting experiment. Or whatever you wanna call
                    > it: how do you consider it?

                    This is just what I do. I like to code and I would like to contribute
                    where possible.

                    Actually, it would be interesting if we could have a public repository
                    of user stories and their solutions in various implementations just as
                    we have repositories for patterns.

                    Mike Cohn owns www.userstories.com but userstories.org is up for grabs.

                    Working on this idea... it would seem natural that agile code shops
                    would have such repositories implemented as part of their knowledge
                    base. A simple wiki fits the bill perfectly.

                    >
                    > Another question is: I'm taken for granted that you are going to implement
                    > only OSS (or the like) and keep everything public, but am I wrong?
                    >

                    I am open to signing an NDA and keeping the contribution closed
                    sourced as long as I can mention my contribution in my blog in some
                    manner. So... I cannot work with someone in stealth mode for free
                    unless they allow me to at least mention the work for example, "Today
                    I worked building a widget that fulfils the following user story...".

                    So... using the words of Erdos, "my brain is open".

                    Do you have a user story?

                    -H
                  • Robert Hanson
                    Sounds to me like this could be worked into a book User Stories: examples and implementation or something like that. But what a great idea (repository of
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jan 27, 2006
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                      Sounds to me like this could be worked into a book "User Stories:
                      examples and implementation" or something like that.

                      But what a great idea (repository of user stories). But my
                      understanding is that the trip from a user story on a card to the code
                      is much more complicated, involving communication with the customer,
                      revision and knowledge sharing, etc. It would be *really cool* to
                      capture this as well as the final outcome.

                      Of course, a user story is often an incremental change to a software
                      system, not a "stand alone" solution, so you may end up with an
                      additional column in a database plus a couple of business rules plus
                      some gui widgets. Hard to represent this as just code.



                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Hugo Garcia
                      Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 9:55 AM
                      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [XP] Free Developer: just submit your user story or give me
                      your code tests ANN]

                      > Hello Hugo,
                      >
                      > I think this is a very interesting experiment. Or whatever you wanna
                      call
                      > it: how do you consider it?

                      This is just what I do. I like to code and I would like to contribute
                      where possible.

                      Actually, it would be interesting if we could have a public repository
                      of user stories and their solutions in various implementations just as
                      we have repositories for patterns.

                      Mike Cohn owns www.userstories.com but userstories.org is up for grabs.

                      Working on this idea... it would seem natural that agile code shops
                      would have such repositories implemented as part of their knowledge
                      base. A simple wiki fits the bill perfectly.

                      >
                      > Another question is: I'm taken for granted that you are going to
                      implement
                      > only OSS (or the like) and keep everything public, but am I wrong?
                      >

                      I am open to signing an NDA and keeping the contribution closed
                      sourced as long as I can mention my contribution in my blog in some
                      manner. So... I cannot work with someone in stealth mode for free
                      unless they allow me to at least mention the work for example, "Today
                      I worked building a widget that fulfils the following user story...".

                      So... using the words of Erdos, "my brain is open".

                      Do you have a user story?

                      -H


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                    • Jeff Langr
                      Hey, another thought, another potential story or set of em. I wish Eclipse was more test-aware. Off the top of my head: One feature that I can remember
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jan 27, 2006
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                        Hey, another thought, another potential story or set of 'em. I wish
                        Eclipse was more test-aware.

                        Off the top of my head: One feature that I can remember wishing for is
                        the ability to search for references to a Java element, usually a method
                        or class, *without* reporting references found in tests. Maybe the
                        ability to filter tests out of Working Sets would work for this one, or
                        perhaps allow for a quick filter button on the Search results dialog
                        (there's already a way to remove matches from Search results).

                        Another one, a new refactoring:
                        - Refactor local variable initialization to field initialized in setUp

                        So, take something like:

                        public void testCreate() {
                        Book book = new Book();
                        // ...
                        }

                        and end up with:

                        private Book book;
                        protected void setUp() {
                        book = new Book();
                        }
                        public void testCreate() {
                        // ...
                        }

                        It'd also potentially look for the same initialization in other test
                        methods and remove them.

                        There are definitely more, similar kinds of feature requests that I'm
                        not remembering, stuff that's centered around JUnit testing.

                        Jeff

                        Hugo Garcia wrote:

                        >On 1/26/06, Jeff Langr <jeff@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >>Sounds exciting. Let me know how you want me to get involved. I'm
                        >>particularly curious about your experiences in getting stuff
                        >>incorporated into Eclipse.
                        >>
                        >>
                        >
                        >Well... you are the Customer of course :)
                        >
                        >I have updated my blog at http://oogo.blogspot.com/
                        >
                        >To everyone:
                        >
                        >Please feel free to send me user stories and/or coding problems/tests.
                        >

                        --
                        Langr Software Solutions
                        http://langrsoft.com
                        author, Agile Java: Crafting Code With Test-Driven Development
                      • Piergiuliano Bossi
                        ... Something less tautological? Actually, it would be interesting if we could have a public repository ... The idea is interesting, but, as the name suggests,
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jan 27, 2006
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                          On 1/27/06, Hugo Garcia <hugo.a.garcia@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > This is just what I do.


                          :)
                          Something less tautological?

                          Actually, it would be interesting if we could have a public repository
                          > of user stories and their solutions in various implementations just as
                          > we have repositories for patterns.


                          The idea is interesting, but, as the name suggests, user stories are related
                          to particular users. Even if you and I may have exactly the same need I'm
                          quite sure we would come up with different user stories. The interaction
                          with the team (well, you in this case) is another element that will bring
                          even more variance in.
                          Nevertheless it would be nice & useful to have a collective repository where
                          we can show examples of user stories. Interacting via emails is not the best
                          media to say the least, but given enough time we may come up with some
                          significance in any case.

                          Working on this idea... it would seem natural that agile code shops
                          > would have such repositories implemented as part of their knowledge
                          > base. A simple wiki fits the bill perfectly.


                          Ah, you are tangentially addressing one issue that I care a lot: the idea of
                          having running specs in a wiki (ie: Fitnesse) as a means of documenting and
                          specifying what a user story really means in customer's mind. Probably not
                          exactly what you had in mind, but highly correlated I think. Again, don't
                          forget that each customer has different perspectives, but I'm quite sure
                          that it is possible to capture several functional patterns. And there's
                          more: as time goes by it should be theoritically possible and practically
                          manageable to isolate little pieces of interaction which are recurring here
                          and there in user stories, within the same project or even across several
                          projects. I'm not talking about reusing code here, just functional elements,
                          especially within a well defined domain. The natural evolution would be to
                          develop a DSL for this kind of stuff, but I'm surely going too far, one step
                          at a time.

                          I am open to signing an NDA and keeping the contribution closed
                          > sourced as long as I can mention my contribution in my blog in some
                          > manner. So... I cannot work with someone in stealth mode for free
                          > unless they allow me to at least mention the work for example, "Today
                          > I worked building a widget that fulfils the following user story...".
                          >
                          > So... using the words of Erdos, "my brain is open".


                          So am I. And I am more interested to public informations and interactions.

                          Do you have a user story?


                          Tons. Where to start?

                          For example: I often find myself evaluating the status of a huge chunk of
                          code *also* by means of static verification and metrics tools. One thing
                          that I particularly like for evaluating OO complexity is LCOM (Lack Of
                          Cohesion in Methods as defined by Henderson-Sellers, check for example
                          http://www.teaminabox.co.uk/downloads/metrics/descriptions/LackOfCohesionInMethods.html).
                          As far as I know there are not many tools that do that on java codebases
                          (eclipse metrics plugin is one, teaminabox metrics plugin for eclipse is
                          another one), but either they are awkward to use outside eclipse
                          environment, or inconvenient for a multiproject codebase. Hence, it would be
                          nice to have a utility which, given a set of paths and inclusion/exclusion
                          filter rules, it calculate average LCOM x class, package, project, entire
                          codebase. Of course, it would be nice here as well to being able of filter
                          out test cases. This can be done in java, but other languages may be a
                          perfect fit. Output in plain simple text and/or xml and/or html.

                          Good.

                          Are you able to give an estimate
                          Do you want me to split it? :-)

                          Ciao
                          Giuliano


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Rick Mugridge
                          ... Yes, Developing specs that are based on the domain seems key to me. Commenting on what you say from And there s more ... : Yes, I agree. We can do much of
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jan 27, 2006
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                            Piergiuliano Bossi wrote:
                            > On 1/27/06, Hugo Garcia <hugo.a.garcia@...> wrote:
                            >> Working on this idea... it would seem natural that agile code shops
                            >> would have such repositories implemented as part of their knowledge
                            >> base. A simple wiki fits the bill perfectly.
                            >
                            >
                            > Ah, you are tangentially addressing one issue that I care a lot: the idea of
                            > having running specs in a wiki (ie: Fitnesse) as a means of documenting and
                            > specifying what a user story really means in customer's mind. Probably not
                            > exactly what you had in mind, but highly correlated I think. Again, don't
                            > forget that each customer has different perspectives, but I'm quite sure
                            > that it is possible to capture several functional patterns. And there's
                            > more: as time goes by it should be theoritically possible and practically
                            > manageable to isolate little pieces of interaction which are recurring here
                            > and there in user stories, within the same project or even across several
                            > projects. I'm not talking about reusing code here, just functional elements,
                            > especially within a well defined domain. The natural evolution would be to
                            > develop a DSL for this kind of stuff, but I'm surely going too far, one step
                            > at a time.

                            Yes, Developing specs that are based on the domain seems key to me.

                            Commenting on what you say from "And there's more ...":

                            Yes, I agree. We can do much of this now with executable specs, although
                            I haven't yet tried to carry storytests across projects. However, it
                            would be natural to provide storytests for generally-useful domain
                            objects such as Money, CreditCard, etc along with the code.

                            Little pieces of interaction often get abstracted out, such as into
                            calculation or constraint rules. These can concisely get to the heart of
                            business rules that correspond to side-effect free functions. And little
                            pieces of workflow can be automatically combined to test "scenarios".

                            You're not going too far. I use FitLibrary storytests to develop a DSL
                            for the domain, directly supporting domain driven design. Further steps
                            are needed to refine this, but we're getting close...

                            Cheers, Rick
                          • Mark Wilden
                            From: Hiller, Dean ... Hey, you re lucky! In Ruby, you can t right-click in the Outline view -- the best you can do is run all
                            Message 13 of 16 , Feb 1, 2006
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                              From: "Hiller, Dean" <dhiller@...>

                              >I have a user story I would love to see. Right click on a JUnit method and
                              > be able to select run as JUnit test and it runs only that one method
                              > test(instead of running the whole suite). Right now, I have to go over to
                              > outline and right click on the method there(and it took me forever to find
                              > that).

                              Hey, you're lucky! In Ruby, you can't right-click in the Outline view -- the
                              best you can do is run all the tests, then right-click the one you're
                              working on in Test::Unit view. And Ctrl-F11, "run last test," always runs
                              the whole file, instead of the last test.
                            • David Bogus
                              ... I make a launch config called Run One Test for times when I want to keep running just one or two tests. You set the program argument to,
                              Message 14 of 16 , Feb 1, 2006
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                                > Hey, you're lucky! In Ruby, you can't right-click in the Outline view -- the
                                > best you can do is run all the tests, then right-click the one you're
                                > working on in Test::Unit view.

                                I make a launch config called Run One Test for times when I want to
                                keep running just one or two tests. You set the program argument to,
                                "--name=test_method_one, test_method_two", in the launch config. This
                                makes working on long running test suits more bearable for me.

                                DmB

                                --
                                Dave's Definitions: Morning, is after I've slept for more than four
                                hours. Lunch is the second meal of the day no matter the hour of
                                consumption. A long drive is one longer then you have last slept.
                                Ineffable, if you don't understand I couldn't possibly explain it.
                              • Jeff Langr
                                ... Sounds just like what I described. I ll take a look. Thanks! Jeff -- Langr Software Solutions http://langrsoft.com author, Agile Java: Crafting Code With
                                Message 15 of 16 , Feb 2, 2006
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                                  Steve Bate wrote:
                                  > Have you seen...
                                  >
                                  > http://sourceforge.net/projects/junitrunner/
                                  >
                                  > "Eclipse plugin to allow run/debug junit test method using
                                  > context popup menu. Method to launch is defined by cursor
                                  > position. If cursor between methods the whole junit class
                                  > is launched."
                                  >
                                  > Is this what you want? If so, if you are using an Eclipse version < 3.2, be
                                  > sure to use JUnitRunner 1.1.0 instead of the latest version.
                                  >
                                  Sounds just like what I described. I'll take a look. Thanks!

                                  Jeff

                                  --
                                  Langr Software Solutions
                                  http://langrsoft.com
                                  author, Agile Java: Crafting Code With Test-Driven Development
                                • Jeff Langr
                                  JUnitRunner version 1.1.2 runs under Eclipse 3.1, and provides a keyboard hook (which v1.1.0) does not. Works great. Jeff -- Langr Software Solutions
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Feb 2, 2006
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                                    JUnitRunner version 1.1.2 runs under Eclipse 3.1, and provides a
                                    keyboard hook (which v1.1.0) does not. Works great.

                                    Jeff

                                    --
                                    Langr Software Solutions
                                    http://langrsoft.com
                                    author, Agile Java: Crafting Code With Test-Driven Development


                                    > Steve Bate wrote:
                                    >
                                    >> Have you seen...
                                    >>
                                    >> http://sourceforge.net/projects/junitrunner/
                                    >>
                                    >> "Eclipse plugin to allow run/debug junit test method using
                                    >> context popup menu. Method to launch is defined by cursor
                                    >> position. If cursor between methods the whole junit class
                                    >> is launched."
                                    >>
                                    >> Is this what you want? If so, if you are using an Eclipse version < 3.2, be
                                    >> sure to use JUnitRunner 1.1.0 instead of the latest version.
                                    >>
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