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Re: [AM] Anecdotal and Case Study Evidence that Up-front Requirements Enginee...

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  • Dave Rooney
    (Apologies for x-posting, but this applies to both groups) ... Agreed, one project does not a trend make. Of course, people have said the same about the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 13, 2006
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      (Apologies for x-posting, but this applies to both groups)

      PeteCRuth@... wrote:
      > [snipped]
      >
      > "It's very hard to validate that a method works in practice, on problems
      > faced by industry and government.
      >
      > Must do empirical validation that a method works."
      >
      > IMHO, a sample size of one project can hardly be characterized as an
      > accurate statistical justification for the claim that getting all of the
      > requirements completely right up front guarantees success.

      Agreed, one project does not a trend make. Of course, people have said
      the same about the Chrysler C3 project!

      Something that did catch my eye that I haven't yet seen mentioned is on
      page 34 (part of the Philips case study) where he states:

      "The RS would have to be of only the user visible behavior, to have a
      pure WHAT RS with complete freedom to choose the HOW based on the
      available technology ..."

      That makes perfect sense, and sounds an awful lot like User Stories to
      me. Given that and the 6-month time-frame the product development team
      had, I could envision an XP-style Release Planning process with 1 or 2
      releases. For those releases, you have to have the high-level business
      stories up front in order to estimate and plan.

      So, to me, the case study doesn't sound so much like a victory for BUFR,
      as for properly stating them from the Customer's perspective and
      performing Release Planning. The use of the matrices is interesting,
      and might be something to look at. Of course, for the price of one
      licence of a requirements management tool, you could buy out a store's
      supply of those new Sortable Post-it Cards and stick them on a wall.

      Dave Rooney
      Mayford Technologies
      http://www.mayford.ca
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