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Re: [XP] nondeterministic acceptance tests

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  • Victor
    I would say there is an issue with terminology. In the context we are talking about, problem may have more than one meaning. One is the problem as stated,
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 6, 2005
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      I would say there is an issue with terminology. In the context we are
      talking about, "problem" may have more than one meaning. One is the problem
      as stated, and another one would also include the circumstances under which
      it should be solved. I wish I had a richer vocabulary to differentiate
      between the two.

      And then there is the problem <--> solution space, which deserves its own
      word.

      Victor

      ===============================================
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Ron Jeffries" <ronjeffries@...>
      To: <extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, November 06, 2005 5:42 PM
      Subject: Re: [XP] nondeterministic acceptance tests


      > On Sunday, November 6, 2005, at 2:32:14 PM, Victor wrote:
      >
      > >> I'm not sure that the problem /is/ different. The importance of
      > >> being correct is different, but the solutions are available to us
      > >> all, are they not?
      >
      > > Good point. To a point. :-)
      > > If the severity of the problem affects the approach to the solution,
      then
      > > the problem is different. Quite frequently the formal statement of a
      > > problem doesn't really cover all its aspects. Many times problems come
      > > shaped in layers, like onions. There is the formal specification, and
      there
      > > are circumstances like severity and resources. So, solving the
      mathematical
      > > aspect is only one step towards the implementation of a solution.
      >
      > So you are saying that the solution is part of the problem? That's
      > an interesting formulation that I've not usually heard, though of
      > course the two are interrelated.
      >
      > Ron Jeffries
      > www.XProgramming.com
      > Do, or do not. There is no try. --Yoda
      >
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