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Re: [XP] Informative workspace

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  • William Pietri
    ... That s actually an excellent suggestion. Part of XP comes from its participatory power. Having a map of the territory is good; I m fond of Ron s
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 1, 2005
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      Steven J. Owens wrote:

      >On Mon, Oct 31, 2005 at 09:00:53AM +0200, Kevin Trethewey wrote:
      >
      >
      >>I would like to get some posters up on the values, principles and
      >>practices of XP - the sort of thing that will assist them to be aware of the
      >>way they should be thinking and doing things day to day.
      >>
      >>
      >
      > Post-It sells these giant Post-It tablets. You can buy markers
      >at a variety of convenient stores :-).
      >
      >

      That's actually an excellent suggestion. Part of XP comes from its
      participatory power. Having a map of the territory is good; I'm fond of
      Ron's concentric-circles diagram. But Kevin, it may be even better if
      you get the people in the room to maintain a list of the practices that
      *they* think are important to focus on. Updating that could be a part of
      your weekly meeting.

      William



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ilja Preuss
      ... I wholeheartedly agree. Some additional suggestions: - make it simple. Focus on two or three practices that are most important to the team. - make it
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 2, 2005
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        > That's actually an excellent suggestion. Part of XP comes from its
        > participatory power. Having a map of the territory is good; I'm fond
        > of Ron's concentric-circles diagram. But Kevin, it may be even better
        > if you get the people in the room to maintain a list of the practices
        > that
        > *they* think are important to focus on. Updating that could be a part
        > of your weekly meeting.

        I wholeheartedly agree. Some additional suggestions:

        - make it simple. Focus on two or three practices that are most important to
        the team.
        - make it flashy - big and multi-colored. (The colors don't have to mean
        anything.)
        - think about doing a Big Visible Chart on how the team is improving. For
        example, have a tally on tests written in a week or something.

        Cheers, Ilja
        --
        disy Informationssysteme GmbH
        Ilja Preuß, Software Engineer
        Stephanienstr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe, Deutschland
        Tel: +49 721 1 600 622, Fax: -605, E-Mail: preuss@...

        http://www.disy.net/cadenza - Berichte und Auswertungen mit Raumbezug
        http://www.disy.net/e-meetings - Telefon- und Web-Konferenzen
      • Sam Gentile
        As others have pointed out, part of XP s power comes from partipatory activities. Try to involve the Whole Team to come up with a list that is important to
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 2, 2005
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          As others have pointed out, part of XP's power comes from partipatory
          activities. Try to involve the Whole Team to come up with a list that is
          important to them and in everything you do. The power doesn't come from
          books and charts but organically from involving people in the process and
          learning from it. We also have employed the Big Visible Chart on our Agile
          team and it is really helping.

          All the best,

          On 11/2/05, Ilja Preuss <preuss@...> wrote:
          >
          > > That's actually an excellent suggestion. Part of XP comes from its
          > > participatory power. Having a map of the territory is good; I'm fond
          > > of Ron's concentric-circles diagram. But Kevin, it may be even better
          > > if you get the people in the room to maintain a list of the practices
          > > that
          > > *they* think are important to focus on. Updating that could be a part
          > > of your weekly meeting.
          >
          > I wholeheartedly agree. Some additional suggestions:
          >
          > - make it simple. Focus on two or three practices that are most important
          > to
          > the team.
          > - make it flashy - big and multi-colored. (The colors don't have to mean
          > anything.)
          > - think about doing a Big Visible Chart on how the team is improving. For
          > example, have a tally on tests written in a week or something.
          >
          > Cheers, Ilja
          > --
          > disy Informationssysteme GmbH
          > Ilja Preuß, Software Engineer
          > Stephanienstr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe, Deutschland
          > Tel: +49 721 1 600 622, Fax: -605, E-Mail: preuss@...
          >
          > http://www.disy.net/cadenza - Berichte und Auswertungen mit Raumbezug
          > http://www.disy.net/e-meetings - Telefon- und Web-Konferenzen
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
          >
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
          >
          > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com <http://objectmentor.com>
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Sam Gentile
          INETA Speaker, Microsoft MVP-Solutions Architect, UG Leader Beantown .NET
          .NET Blog: http://samgentile.com/blog/
          .NET Portal: http://samgentile.com/


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kent Beck
          Kevin, I like my workspace to be about my project. My goal is to be able to walk in the room and in a few seconds get a sense of how the project is doing.
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 4, 2005
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            Kevin,

            I like my workspace to be about my project. My goal is to be able to walk in
            the room and in a few seconds get a sense of how the project is doing.
            Having a sense of how the project is going helps me direct my efforts
            efficiently toward shared goals and helps me feel connected to the team.

            This seems different to me than "assist them to be aware of the way they
            should be thinking". I resist when someone tells me how I should think, even
            if I "should" be thinking that way.

            Take continuous integration for example. I could put up a poster of a
            glowering Uncle Sam pointing his finger and saying, "I want YOU to check in
            soon". Or I could put up a chart with a green or red dot on the X axis
            whenever a build succeeds or fails. The poster seems pushy and controlling
            to me but the chart seems helpful. Stacking several weeks worth of data one
            above the other might help me spot ineffective patterns like everyone
            waiting until the end of the day to check in or the last check in of the day
            causing the build to fail.

            What about your project would you like to be more aware of?

            Kent Beck
            Three Rivers Institute

            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            > Kevin Trethewey
            > Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2005 11:01 PM
            > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [XP] Informative workspace
            >
            > Morning all
            >
            > I have just started a contract with a new company that is
            > trying to move
            > into an XP style of development. Most of the team members
            > have never worked
            > in an XP/Agile environment before and in line with the
            > informative workspace
            > practice I would like to get some posters up on the values,
            > principles and
            > practices of XP - the sort of thing that will assist them to
            > be aware of the
            > way they should be thinking and doing things day to day.
            >
            > Does anyone have a link to a website or other good resource
            > where i might be
            > able to get posters or diagrams that we could put up around our office
            > space?
            >
            > Best Regards
            > Kevin Trethewey
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
            >
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
            >
            > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Alex Pimenov
            ... Some of our customers reported that they made a browser to open Parabuild s recent continous integration builds results when a workstation is powered up to
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 4, 2005
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              > I like my workspace to be about my project. My goal is to be able to walk in
              > the room and in a few seconds get a sense of how the project is doing.
              > Having a sense of how the project is going helps me direct my efforts
              > efficiently toward shared goals and helps me feel connected to the team.
              >
              > This seems different to me than "assist them to be aware of the way they
              > should be thinking". I resist when someone tells me how I should think, even
              > if I "should" be thinking that way.
              >
              > Take continuous integration for example. I could put up a poster of a
              > glowering Uncle Sam pointing his finger and saying, "I want YOU to
              > check in soon". Or I could put up a chart with a green or red dot on
              > the X axis whenever a build succeeds or fails. The poster seems pushy
              > and controlling to me but the chart seems helpful. Stacking several
              > weeks worth of data one above the other might help me spot
              > ineffective patterns like everyone waiting until the end of the day
              > to check in or the last check in of the day
              > causing the build to fail.

              Some of our customers reported that they made a browser
              to open Parabuild's recent continous integration builds
              results when a workstation is powered up to see what has
              been going on, something like that:

              http://www.viewtier.com/products/parabuild/screenshots/screen_shot_4_build_history.htm

              The good thing about this approach is that this data is live,
              not something hanging on the wall (unless you have hung
              an LCD on the wall :)

              --Alex
            • Ilja Preuss
              ... We have something similar: a telemetrics monitor with a web-browser cycling through interesting project web pages every twenty seconds - Cruise Control
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 7, 2005
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                > Some of our customers reported that they made a browser
                > to open Parabuild's recent continous integration builds
                > results when a workstation is powered up to see what has
                > been going on, something like that:
                >
                > http://www.viewtier.com/products/parabuild/screenshots/screen_
                > shot_4_build_history.htm

                We have something similar: a "telemetrics monitor" with a web-browser
                cycling through interesting project web pages every twenty seconds - Cruise
                Control state, complete bug list etc.

                > The good thing about this approach is that this data is live, not
                > something hanging on the wall

                That's not exclusively a good thing, not at all. It's good for data that
                changes very frequently, such as every couple of minutes, because updating
                that manually often seems unrealistic.

                For data that we don't need to update that often, a manual chart on the wall
                actually works *much* better, in my experience. It is more tangible and
                involving, especially if you can make updating it a team ritual.

                Cheers, Ilja
              • Ron Jeffries
                ... And it can be bigger and eye-catching, without costing much at all. Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com How do I know what I think until I hear what I say?
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 7, 2005
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                  On Monday, November 7, 2005, at 6:43:05 AM, Ilja Preuss wrote:

                  > For data that we don't need to update that often, a manual chart on the wall
                  > actually works *much* better, in my experience. It is more tangible and
                  > involving, especially if you can make updating it a team ritual.

                  And it can be bigger and eye-catching, without costing much at all.

                  Ron Jeffries
                  www.XProgramming.com
                  How do I know what I think until I hear what I say? -- E M Forster
                • Ilja Preuss
                  ... Regarding big, I think it would be cool to have a beamer beaming our telemetrics info on a big wall. I suspect that a handdrawn thing still is better,
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 7, 2005
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                    extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                    > Importance: High
                    >
                    >
                    > On Monday, November 7, 2005, at 6:43:05 AM, Ilja Preuss wrote:
                    >
                    >> For data that we don't need to update that often, a manual chart on
                    >> the wall actually works *much* better, in my experience. It is more
                    >> tangible and involving, especially if you can make updating it a team
                    >> ritual.
                    >
                    > And it can be bigger and eye-catching, without costing much at all.

                    Regarding big, I think it would be cool to have a beamer beaming our
                    telemetrics info on a big wall. I suspect that a handdrawn thing still is
                    better, typically.

                    As an aside, a coworker added an applet to the telemetrics page that lets
                    grow a cactus each day. At the end of the day it even starts to bloom. It
                    turned out to be a real eye-catcher - often I just look at the monitor to
                    see the current cactus, and sometimes I end up spotting some other
                    interesting info on the way, too...

                    Cheers, Ilja
                  • William Pietri
                    ... I agree completely. With this weekly data: http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/#agenda we semi-randomly rotated who updated it every week. I think
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 7, 2005
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                      Ilja Preuss wrote:

                      >For data that we don't need to update that often, a manual chart on the wall
                      >actually works *much* better, in my experience. It is more tangible and
                      >involving, especially if you can make updating it a team ritual.
                      >
                      >

                      I agree completely. With this weekly data:

                      http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/#agenda

                      we semi-randomly rotated who updated it every week. I think the fact
                      that everybody was comfortable changing it was a factor in the addition
                      of a couple of valuable metrics, both of which were just put up there by
                      developers.

                      I think it's similar to the magic that powers Wikis. Many of the
                      Wikipedia contributors I've looked at started out with minor edits with
                      no intention of doing anything more. But there's a virtuous circle: the
                      power to change things encourages more careful attention. That leads to
                      more tinkering, which if successful gives a greater feeling of power and
                      more of a sense of ownership.

                      William
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