Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [XP] Re: XP in 40 words

Expand Messages
  • Russel Hill
    As I mentioned in a previous post... I ve been on the other end of this one. Taking over a project after the original development team left.. While the docs
    Message 1 of 105 , Sep 1, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      As I mentioned in a previous post... I've been on the other end of this
      one. Taking over a project after the original development team left..

      While the docs may be REQUIRED, they may or may not actually help the new
      team. In our case, ... they did not.

      Of course, in our case we didn't have a patients life at stake... only a
      pilot and crew.

      At 09:55 AM 9/1/00 -0500, you wrote:
      >-----Original Message-----
      >From: Kent Beck <kentbeck@...>
      >Date: Thursday, August 31, 2000 5:51 PM
      >
      > >Would someone here please tell a story of when the documents they needed
      > >deep in maintenance were there and accurate and helpful? I believe that
      > >preparing for the "next game" by writing documents is an illusion, a cargo
      > >cult. I assume that writing documents to enable maintenance is against the
      > >laws of nature, that the documents are never there. Now what- clean code,
      > >comprehensive tests, and a social structure that tends to preserve the most
      > >important information for as long as possible.
      >
      >
      >Not to argue too much about this, but to defend what's happening here...
      >We are developing a "major criticality" implanted medical device. We
      >are required to do a lot of documents for regulatory purposes. Another
      >reason for docs is for the day when we are most likely sold to a larger
      >company, most likely in a far-off town. This engineer will no longer be
      >with the company, and I'd imagine many others would also refuse
      >relocation. So, in our case, the "social structure" would largely vanish
      >and all the buying company would get is a lot of papers and some
      >software. When the people are gone, the docs, if well-written and
      >kept current (they *have* to be), are mighty handy for conveying info
      >going a little above and beyond what code alone can convey. But that
      >may be only for special cases like ours, where misunderstandings
      >could lead to patient injury or death, and regulations require it.
      ><><
      >Kenneth W. Boyer Jr., CSQE
      >Senior Software Engineer
      >VASCOR, Inc.
      >
      >
      >
      >To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
      >
      >To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      >extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
      >
      >Ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
    • David H
      ... There is none. Both do completely different things. Have a look at: http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/dita/index.jsp or
      Message 105 of 105 , Sep 7, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Paul wrote:

        >
        >
        > so what's the benefit of DITA versus NDoc?
        >

        There is none. Both do completely different things.
        Have a look at:

        http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/topics/dita/index.jsp

        or

        http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/x-dita1/

        To better understand what the intent behind DITA is.
        Basically you are trying to single source _all_ documentation based on a
        topic structure. Thus being able to generate End user documentation and
        Technical documentation, developer documentation and so on, from the
        same source.

        -d
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.