Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [XP] Top 3 agile practices to use when installing an agile method?

Expand Messages
  • Kent Beck
    June, Thank you for your post. It reminded me clearly and concretely that I can have influence without resorting to either manipulation or coercion. Take care,
    Message 1 of 113 , Sep 7, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      June,

      Thank you for your post. It reminded me clearly and concretely that I can
      have influence without resorting to either manipulation or coercion.

      Take care,

      Kent Beck
      Three Rivers Institute

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of June Kim
      > Sent: Sunday, September 04, 2005 6:52 AM
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [XP] Top 3 agile practices to use when
      > installing an agile method?
      >
      >
      > You are right. I used a few strategies to move the people into action
      > from awareness, and still interested in others' experiences.
      >
      > 1. We used pull mode not push mode. I showed and explained about the
      > code metrics wiki page to the team members at their regular weekly
      > meeting. And told them it's not for blaming or assessing anyone --
      > "those are tools for you". A few people might have felt about this
      > uncomfortable but a few (who were accidentally in charge of the top
      > complex method on the list) didn't feel uncomfortable and even laughed
      > looking at each other -- the atmosphere was okay. I never tried to
      > push the people into refactoring something, but said I'm here and
      > ready to help you when you want to refactor.
      >
      > 2. A pair of developers voluntarily started talking about one specific
      > method after the meeting. The most complex one. It's always been a
      > pain in the neck (the method was also ranking in the top ten for
      > modification frequency list). We nick-named the method as the "Great
      > Devil" and printed the method on paper and pasted it on the wall. Even
      > we printed it with 6 or 7 point fonts, the whole method was taller
      > than me(183cm btw) on the wall.
      >
      > 3. The wall was by the pathway of the team's space. We gathered around
      > the wall and discussed how to refactor (or kill the devil). We marked
      > the paper with colourful markers here and there. Similar patterns, and
      > distinct patterns. Connected here and there.
      >
      > 4. Two pairs of developers(four people) teamed up and each refactored
      > the same method freely, without any worries about breaking the code --
      > we just copied the code into a new file and just tinkered the code.
      > After a couple of practice, the two teams both figured out nice steps
      > of refactoring(some converged and some diverged between the two
      > teams). During refactoring, there was no stress at all since we were
      > not worried about breaking the code.
      >
      > 5. On the next day, the two people started real refactoring. Since the
      > method had no unit tests(if it had, it wouldn't have been so complex),
      > they progressed building one (regression) unit test and then
      > refactoring some part and so on. I thought it might take so long a
      > time, but it took not more than a couple of hours -- they even did it
      > on their free times between their regular jobs. They were refactoring
      > it with a lot of fun. No stress. I think it was one of the key.
      >
      >
      > So what makes people into action from awareness? First, exposure and
      > shaping vague feelings into concrete stuffs(in this case top tens).
      > Then naming them(the Great Devil). Then people started to use the
      > vocabulary and converse on this (on lunch time and tea time as well).
      > Then something physical to represent the problem which is put on where
      > everyone can see and easy to gather around. It was a kind of a center
      > of the activities. It gives the focus. Then a safe atmosphere. Chance
      > to practice/experiment without stress. Some expertise ready to help
      > when called.
      >
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
      >
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
      >
      > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Kent Beck
      June, Thank you for your post. It reminded me clearly and concretely that I can have influence without resorting to either manipulation or coercion. Take care,
      Message 113 of 113 , Sep 7, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        June,

        Thank you for your post. It reminded me clearly and concretely that I can
        have influence without resorting to either manipulation or coercion.

        Take care,

        Kent Beck
        Three Rivers Institute

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of June Kim
        > Sent: Sunday, September 04, 2005 6:52 AM
        > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [XP] Top 3 agile practices to use when
        > installing an agile method?
        >
        >
        > You are right. I used a few strategies to move the people into action
        > from awareness, and still interested in others' experiences.
        >
        > 1. We used pull mode not push mode. I showed and explained about the
        > code metrics wiki page to the team members at their regular weekly
        > meeting. And told them it's not for blaming or assessing anyone --
        > "those are tools for you". A few people might have felt about this
        > uncomfortable but a few (who were accidentally in charge of the top
        > complex method on the list) didn't feel uncomfortable and even laughed
        > looking at each other -- the atmosphere was okay. I never tried to
        > push the people into refactoring something, but said I'm here and
        > ready to help you when you want to refactor.
        >
        > 2. A pair of developers voluntarily started talking about one specific
        > method after the meeting. The most complex one. It's always been a
        > pain in the neck (the method was also ranking in the top ten for
        > modification frequency list). We nick-named the method as the "Great
        > Devil" and printed the method on paper and pasted it on the wall. Even
        > we printed it with 6 or 7 point fonts, the whole method was taller
        > than me(183cm btw) on the wall.
        >
        > 3. The wall was by the pathway of the team's space. We gathered around
        > the wall and discussed how to refactor (or kill the devil). We marked
        > the paper with colourful markers here and there. Similar patterns, and
        > distinct patterns. Connected here and there.
        >
        > 4. Two pairs of developers(four people) teamed up and each refactored
        > the same method freely, without any worries about breaking the code --
        > we just copied the code into a new file and just tinkered the code.
        > After a couple of practice, the two teams both figured out nice steps
        > of refactoring(some converged and some diverged between the two
        > teams). During refactoring, there was no stress at all since we were
        > not worried about breaking the code.
        >
        > 5. On the next day, the two people started real refactoring. Since the
        > method had no unit tests(if it had, it wouldn't have been so complex),
        > they progressed building one (regression) unit test and then
        > refactoring some part and so on. I thought it might take so long a
        > time, but it took not more than a couple of hours -- they even did it
        > on their free times between their regular jobs. They were refactoring
        > it with a lot of fun. No stress. I think it was one of the key.
        >
        >
        > So what makes people into action from awareness? First, exposure and
        > shaping vague feelings into concrete stuffs(in this case top tens).
        > Then naming them(the Great Devil). Then people started to use the
        > vocabulary and converse on this (on lunch time and tea time as well).
        > Then something physical to represent the problem which is put on where
        > everyone can see and easy to gather around. It was a kind of a center
        > of the activities. It gives the focus. Then a safe atmosphere. Chance
        > to practice/experiment without stress. Some expertise ready to help
        > when called.
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
        >
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
        >
        > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.