Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [XP] Gut feeling vs head language

Expand Messages
  • Steve Tooke
    ... I think the only option, really, is honesty. If you aren t on board with a decision you have to question it and try to understand why it was made. This way
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      On 9/1/05, Thomas Eyde <thomas.eyde@...> wrote:
      > The issue, really, is how can I open up the other's mind when I see
      > and feel the pain of bad judgements.

      I think the only option, really, is honesty. If you aren't on board
      with a decision you have to question it and try to understand why it
      was made. This way you get to learn what the PIQ was thinking. During
      this discussion you can point out where your ideas may be a better
      fit, or you may see that the other idea is in fact the better option,
      or some new plan may hit one of you. The best thing is that you should
      both learn something.
    • Cory Foy
      ... I think there are two schools to this. I truly believe there is a camp where people want to refuse to believe there is a problem. However, I think the
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 26, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Thomas Eyde wrote:
        > Sometimes people will simply not understand there is a problem. I have
        > experienced that when I was the more knowledged person on the subject
        > (which, btw, was/is ASP.NET). My opponent on the subject had chosen a
        > hopeless GUI library.
        >
        > Hopeless in my opinion, anyway.
        >
        > Any of my attempts was countered by something which boils down to:
        > "Let's just define the application *not* to be used that way. If the
        > users choose to do otherwise, then it's their problem."
        >
        > So what do we do when people just refuse to understand the problem?

        I think there are two schools to this. I truly believe there is a camp
        where people want to refuse to believe there is a problem. However, I
        think the second camp might be a little more likely. This is the camp
        that doesn't know enough to know they don't know. I've mentioned the
        paper on here once or twice before, but the basic concept is that
        participants in a study proved over and over that they didn't always
        possess the knowledge to recognize how bad they were.

        In those cases, the resistance may be from them not wanting to admit
        that they don't know. I've certainly been guilty of that in my past. The
        only thing that can help in that situation is training, which if they
        pretend like they don't need, can lead to a bad situation.

        Have you seen situations like I am referring to?

        Cory
      • Thomas Eyde
        The only thing I can think of right now, is rejecting the idea of TDD. Except from that, I think I have been blessed with open minded coworkers. The story
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 26, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          The only thing I can think of right now, is rejecting the idea of TDD.
          Except from that, I think I have been blessed with open minded
          coworkers.

          The story about the GUI library is a totally different one. This guy
          is good at what he does, but wait...

          I think you hit the nail!

          In retrospect I think the problem is more that *he* refuse to
          acknowledge he lack information or knowledge. Other people have told
          me this person is over confident in his own expertise.

          I guess because he is good at most thing which he does, makes him
          think he is good at everything he does. I wish I had this insight 9
          moths ago.

          --
          Thomas

          On 9/26/05, Cory Foy <usergroup@...> wrote:
          > I think there are two schools to this. I truly believe there is a camp
          > where people want to refuse to believe there is a problem. However, I
          > think the second camp might be a little more likely. This is the camp
          > that doesn't know enough to know they don't know.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.