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RE: [XP] Article on XP pathologies?

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  • William Pietri
    Hi, Kent! ... That s true, but I m afraid I don t see the connection. Are you suggesting that one shouldn t write articles of the XP Pathologies form? I ask
    Message 1 of 52 , Aug 1, 2005
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      Hi, Kent!

      On Mon, 2005-08-01 at 01:28 -0700, Kent Beck wrote:
      > This sounds like the "XP is a recipe" metaphor to me. Since we are dealing
      > with people, who are quite good at being good in surprising ways, I don't
      > think the results will be predictable. [...]
      >
      > I predict that you could point to a practice, speculate on the results of
      > leaving that practice "out" (since the practices are very flexible it
      > doesn't make sense to me to even say that), and be contradicted by actual
      > experience by someone on this mailing list.

      That's true, but I'm afraid I don't see the connection. Are you
      suggesting that one shouldn't write articles of the "XP Pathologies"
      form?

      I ask because what you write is true about actual recipes as well, and
      those still seem popular and useful for novice chefs.

      William

      --
      William Pietri <william@...>
    • Edmund Schweppe
      ... I rather doubt *that*, if for no other reason than that I Have That Pattern myself. On the other hand, it s probably *easier* for some teams to blame the
      Message 52 of 52 , Aug 5, 2005
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        Ron Jeffries wrote:

        > It just seems very odd to me that a team would be going along, not
        > getting good results, and then say "The book is wrong," rather than
        > "We must be doing something wrong."
        > Maybe I'm the only person most of whose problems seem to come from
        > his own mistakes ...

        I rather doubt *that*, if for no other reason than that I Have That
        Pattern myself.

        On the other hand, it's probably *easier* for some teams to blame the
        book, rather than themselves, when confronted with not-good results.
        When confronted with outright failure, it's even easier to lay the blame
        on "the book", especially since books don't tend to talk back and
        challenge hidden assumptions.
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