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[OT] Top 10 things likely to be overheard from a Klingon Programmer

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  • Shane Mingins
    Top 10 things likely to be overheard from a Klingon Programmer Specifications are for the weak and timid! You question the worthiness of my code? I should kill
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 5, 2005
      Top 10 things likely to be overheard from a Klingon
      Programmer

      Specifications are for the weak and timid!

      You question the worthiness of my code? I should kill
      you where you stand!

      Indentation?! - I will show you how to indent when I
      indent your skull!

      What is this talk of 'release'? Klingons do not make
      software 'releases'. Our software 'escapes' leaving a
      bloody trail of designers and quality assurance people
      in its wake.

      Klingon function calls do not have 'parameters' - they
      have 'arguments' - and they ALWAYS WIN THEM.

      Debugging? Klingons do not debug. Our software does
      not coddle the weak.

      A TRUE Klingon Warrior does not comment on his code!

      Klingon software does NOT have BUGS. It has FEATURES,
      and those features are too sophisticated for a Romulan
      pig like you to understand.

      You cannot truly appreciate Dilbert unless you've read
      it in the original Klingon.

      Our users will know fear and cower before our
      software! Ship it! Ship it and let them flee like the
      dogs they are!


      :-) :-)



      Shane Mingins

      shanemingins@...

      please remove clothes before emailing


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    • Willem Bogaerts
      ... ... Hmm. I am from the planet LISP and only now I understand why klingon skulls have such an irregular form... A further thought: Is
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 6, 2005
        Shane Mingins wrote:
        > Top 10 things likely to be overheard from a Klingon
        > Programmer
        >
        <SNIP WEAPON= BLADE>
        > Indentation?! - I will show you how to indent when I
        > indent your skull!
        Hmm. I am from the planet LISP and only now I understand why klingon
        skulls have such an irregular form...

        A further thought: Is the code hiding feature in dot net a klingon
        cloaking device?

        Live long and prosper,
        Willem Bogaerts
      • Charles Poole
        I m in the process of writing some tests for some new FORTRAN code and I m interested in finding out what people have done - if anything - with regards to unit
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 6, 2005
          I'm in the process of writing some tests for some new FORTRAN code and I'm
          interested in finding out what people have done - if anything - with regards
          to unit testing of FORTRAN. I've seen some stuff from someone in NASA who
          seems to be wrapping FORTRAN calls with Ruby in a home grown framework and
          I've been working on using CppUnit and simply calling the FORTRAN test
          methods from C++.

          Does anyone have any better suggestions?

          Charles Poole
        • Phlip
          ... FORTRAN - f2c - CppUnit - tested modules. But that breaks the guideline test in the same language as the testee . BTW... new Fortran code ? I have a
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 6, 2005
            Charles Poole wrote:

            > I'm in the process of writing some tests for some new FORTRAN code and I'm
            > interested in finding out what people have done - if anything - with regards
            > to unit testing of FORTRAN. I've seen some stuff from someone in NASA who
            > seems to be wrapping FORTRAN calls with Ruby in a home grown framework and
            > I've been working on using CppUnit and simply calling the FORTRAN test
            > methods from C++.
            >
            > Does anyone have any better suggestions?

            FORTRAN -> f2c -> CppUnit -> tested modules.

            But that breaks the guideline "test in the same language as the testee".

            BTW... "new Fortran code"? I have a vision of a hobbyist wearing
            aviator goggles and a scarf, riding their steam-powered horseless
            carriage to the mall.

            --
            Phlip
            http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand
          • Andreas.voellmy@mac.com
            ... I m also really interested in how to unit test Fortran code. I m updating a huge legacy fortran system and would like to start adding unit tests to the
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 6, 2005
              On Wednesday, July 06, 2005, at 08:50AM, Phlip <phlip2005@...> wrote:

              >Charles Poole wrote:
              >
              >> I'm in the process of writing some tests for some new FORTRAN code and I'm
              >> interested in finding out what people have done - if anything - with regards
              >> to unit testing of FORTRAN. I've seen some stuff from someone in NASA who
              >> seems to be wrapping FORTRAN calls with Ruby in a home grown framework and
              >> I've been working on using CppUnit and simply calling the FORTRAN test
              >> methods from C++.
              >>
              >> Does anyone have any better suggestions?
              >
              >FORTRAN -> f2c -> CppUnit -> tested modules.
              >
              >But that breaks the guideline "test in the same language as the testee".
              >
              >BTW... "new Fortran code"? I have a vision of a hobbyist wearing
              >aviator goggles and a scarf, riding their steam-powered horseless
              >carriage to the mall.
              >

              I'm also really interested in how to unit test Fortran code. I'm updating a huge legacy fortran system and would like to start adding unit tests to the system. I currently see 3 options:

              1 - Use CppUnit (or any other Cpp testing framework)
              2 - Use the code written at NASA
              3 - Write a new testing framework in Fortran

              I haven't seen NASA's code, so I don't know how appropriate that option will be. I'm waiting to see their code...in the meantime, I plan to try using CppUnit and explore other options if that becomes too much of a pain.

              Let us know what you find.

              Andreas
            • James Carr
              ... My thoughts exactly. - JC
              Message 6 of 16 , Jul 6, 2005
                > BTW... "new Fortran code"? I have a vision of a hobbyist wearing
                > aviator goggles and a scarf, riding their steam-powered horseless
                > carriage to the mall.

                My thoughts exactly.

                - JC
              • yahoogroups@jhrothjr.com
                From: James Carr To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                Message 7 of 16 , Jul 6, 2005
                  From: "James Carr" <james.r.carr.at.gmail.com@...>
                  To: "extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com"
                  <extremeprogramming.at.yahoogroups.com@...>
                  Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2005 11:24 AM
                  Subject: Re: [XP] FORTRAN unit testing


                  >> BTW... "new Fortran code"? I have a vision of a hobbyist wearing
                  >> aviator goggles and a scarf, riding their steam-powered horseless
                  >> carriage to the mall.
                  >
                  > My thoughts exactly.

                  Fortran is still a very live and visible language - it's just a
                  niche language today. It's quite popular with the numerical
                  types, especially with huge problems that can benefit from
                  things like vectorizing compilers. Either you work in that
                  niche, or you don't.

                  However, I was quite surprised to not see a version
                  of xUnit on Ron's site until I remebered that it's very
                  much a procedural language

                  John Roth
                  >
                  > - JC
                • Tim Haughton
                  It s been a long time since I used Fortran. I had hair then. Back in my I m a cardigan wearing physicist days.... Anyway. I ve never used Fortran.Net, indeed
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                    It's been a long time since I used Fortran. I had hair then. Back in
                    my "I'm a cardigan wearing physicist" days....

                    Anyway. I've never used Fortran.Net, indeed I don't know if it is a
                    mature product yet, but I have to wonder if it can seamlessly call
                    unmanaged Fortran, much the same way as Managed C++ can call unmanaged
                    C++. If it can, could you not simply use a .Net testing tool? I beleive
                    you might be familiar with NUnit ;)

                    Regards,

                    Tim Haughton

                    --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Poole"
                    <cpoole@s...> wrote:
                    > I'm in the process of writing some tests for some new FORTRAN code
                    and I'm
                    > interested in finding out what people have done - if anything - with
                    regards
                    > to unit testing of FORTRAN. I've seen some stuff from someone in
                    NASA who
                    > seems to be wrapping FORTRAN calls with Ruby in a home grown
                    framework and
                    > I've been working on using CppUnit and simply calling the FORTRAN test
                    > methods from C++.
                    >
                    > Does anyone have any better suggestions?
                    >
                    > Charles Poole
                  • Bayley, Alistair
                    ... Being a procedural language doesn t preclude being able to write some kind of unit testing framework - it just won t be a straight clone of JUnit. The list
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                      > From: yahoogroups@... [mailto:yahoogroups@...]
                      >
                      > Fortran is still a very live and visible language - it's just a
                      > niche language today. It's quite popular with the numerical
                      > types, especially with huge problems that can benefit from
                      > things like vectorizing compilers. Either you work in that
                      > niche, or you don't.
                      >
                      > However, I was quite surprised to not see a version
                      > of xUnit on Ron's site until I remebered that it's very
                      > much a procedural language
                      >
                      > John Roth


                      Being a procedural language doesn't preclude being able to write some kind
                      of unit testing framework - it just won't be a straight clone of JUnit. The
                      list at http://www.xprogramming.com/software.htm includes libraries for some
                      procedural languages.

                      IMO, the most useful language feature for writing the framework is some sort
                      of reflective capability, so that test writers don't have to remember to
                      manually hook their tests into the suite.

                      Alistair.

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                    • Willem Bogaerts
                      ... If you want to be testing soon, you might as well write your own code. After all, all a unit test program has to do is check the outcome of a function and
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                        > I'm also really interested in how to unit test Fortran code. I'm updating a huge legacy fortran system and would like to start adding unit tests to the system. I currently see 3 options:
                        >
                        > 1 - Use CppUnit (or any other Cpp testing framework)
                        > 2 - Use the code written at NASA
                        > 3 - Write a new testing framework in Fortran

                        If you want to be testing soon, you might as well write your own code.
                        After all, all a unit test program has to do is check the outcome of a
                        function and show the results. I use unit testing in AutoLisp, which is
                        a procedural language as well. No problem.

                        I am not in favour of using some reflection mechanism for unit tests.
                        That is why I use a simple unit test framework for object-oriented
                        languages instead of a JUnit-clone. If you manually add a test to the
                        suite, you have control over the order of the tests. So you can test the
                        independent code before the code that depends on it. That saves a vast
                        amount of work trying to find out which of the 500 failing tests is the
                        one that really fails itself.

                        Best regards,
                        Willem Bogaerts
                      • Ian Collins
                        ... I m not clear what the problem is here, cppUnit works well as a test framework for C. I can t see any real difference in using this framework for an OO or
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                          Bayley, Alistair wrote:

                          >>From: yahoogroups@... [mailto:yahoogroups@...]
                          >>
                          >>Fortran is still a very live and visible language - it's just a
                          >>niche language today. It's quite popular with the numerical
                          >>types, especially with huge problems that can benefit from
                          >>things like vectorizing compilers. Either you work in that
                          >>niche, or you don't.
                          >>
                          >>However, I was quite surprised to not see a version
                          >>of xUnit on Ron's site until I remebered that it's very
                          >>much a procedural language
                          >>
                          >>John Roth
                          >>
                          >>
                          >
                          >
                          >Being a procedural language doesn't preclude being able to write some kind
                          >of unit testing framework - it just won't be a straight clone of JUnit. The
                          >list at http://www.xprogramming.com/software.htm includes libraries for some
                          >procedural languages.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          I'm not clear what the problem is here, cppUnit works well as a test
                          framework for C. I can't see any real difference in using this
                          framework for an OO or a procedural language.

                          Ian
                        • Phlip
                          ... There are two topics here - Test Collector Pattern, and polymorphic lists. The light CppUnit competitors use a macro TEST(suite, case) to build an object
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                            Ian Collins wrote:

                            > I'm not clear what the problem is here, cppUnit works well as a test
                            > framework for C. I can't see any real difference in using this
                            > framework for an OO or a procedural language.

                            There are two topics here - Test Collector Pattern, and polymorphic lists.

                            The light CppUnit competitors use a macro TEST(suite, case) to build
                            an object and register it with a list of cases. Automatic registration
                            is a good goal. Some *Units use reflection to achieve Test Collector
                            Pattern. It's just a convenience, following the rule "tests should be
                            as easy as possible to write."

                            However, once something registers the cases with the polymorphic list,
                            then the Test Isolation principle takes over. Between tests, ideally,
                            the only thing alive in memory is the test rig. So as a language
                            inhibits polymorphism, it inhibits building fixtures into test suites,
                            with useful setUp and tearDown methods.

                            I once TDDed Visual Basic Classic, with no permission to spend time
                            researching a test rig, by simply writing a function called Suite(),
                            calling it from Main(), and filling it with a stoopid list of calls to
                            tests:

                            Call TestThis()
                            Call TestThat()
                            ...

                            Then the assertions used Debug.Assert. I'm unaware of better Fault
                            Navigation in VB.

                            --
                            Phlip
                            http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand
                          • arvoellmy
                            Is anyone interested in fortran unit testing also going to Agile 2005? I m wondering if anyone would be interested in using some open space time to work on a
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jul 7, 2005
                              Is anyone interested in fortran unit testing also going to Agile
                              2005? I'm wondering if anyone
                              would be interested in using some open space time to work on a unit
                              testing framework in
                              fortran?

                              Andreas
                            • Ian Collins
                              ... But it doesn t preclude using a C++ framework for testing C (or FORTRAN). So as long as the framework language can call the procedural one, where s the
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jul 8, 2005
                                Phlip wrote:

                                >Ian Collins wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >>I'm not clear what the problem is here, cppUnit works well as a test
                                >>framework for C. I can't see any real difference in using this
                                >>framework for an OO or a procedural language.
                                >>
                                >>
                                >
                                >There are two topics here - Test Collector Pattern, and polymorphic lists.
                                >
                                >The light CppUnit competitors use a macro TEST(suite, case) to build
                                >an object and register it with a list of cases. Automatic registration
                                >is a good goal. Some *Units use reflection to achieve Test Collector
                                >Pattern. It's just a convenience, following the rule "tests should be
                                >as easy as possible to write."
                                >
                                >However, once something registers the cases with the polymorphic list,
                                >then the Test Isolation principle takes over. Between tests, ideally,
                                >the only thing alive in memory is the test rig. So as a language
                                >inhibits polymorphism, it inhibits building fixtures into test suites,
                                >with useful setUp and tearDown methods.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                But it doesn't preclude using a C++ framework for testing C (or
                                FORTRAN). So as long as the framework language can call the procedural
                                one, where's the problem? I either call the C functions directly if
                                they have no dependencies, or use a C++ helper class to mock the
                                environment for the C function.

                                Ian.
                              • Bayley, Alistair
                                ... There s no problem. Nice if you can do it, but not all languages have that bridge. Often the framework must be written in the same language as the software
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jul 8, 2005
                                  > From: Ian Collins [mailto:ian@...]
                                  >
                                  > But it doesn't preclude using a C++ framework for testing C (or
                                  > FORTRAN). So as long as the framework language can call the
                                  > procedural one, where's the problem?

                                  There's no problem. Nice if you can do it, but not all languages have that
                                  bridge. Often the framework must be written in the same language as the
                                  software being tested.

                                  Nothing precludes you from writing a test framework in any language. It just
                                  that certain language features make the framework less intrusive,
                                  lightweight, easier-to-use. I believe that (as Phlip pointed out) the
                                  CppUnit frameworks typically have a test registration macro, or an
                                  equivalent convention. Contrast with NUnit or JUnit, which use reflection to
                                  identify the test methods (and setup and teardown) i.e. there's no need to
                                  explicitly register your tests. Also, the latest NUnit doesn't require you
                                  to inherit from TestCase; you just label the tests with .Net attributes.
                                  They're small things, but "every little helps" ( (c) Tesco ).

                                  Alistair.

                                  -----------------------------------------
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                                  attachments, may contain confidential and/or privileged material. It is
                                  intended solely for the person(s) or entity to which it is addressed. Any
                                  review, retransmission, dissemination, or taking of any action in
                                  reliance upon this information by persons or entities other than the
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                                • Charlie Poole
                                  Hi Tim, ... I figured somebody would think I was the poster. Not so. Obviously an imposter... ;-) I don t think writing a simple test framework in Fortan is
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jul 16, 2005
                                    Hi Tim,

                                    > I beleive
                                    > you might be familiar with NUnit ;)

                                    I figured somebody would think I was the poster. Not so. Obviously
                                    an imposter... ;-)

                                    I don't think writing a simple test framework in Fortan is out of the
                                    question at all. You'd just have to forget about all the features you
                                    imagine you need and start writing tests.

                                    Charlie Poole
                                    charlie@...
                                    charlie@...

                                    > Regards,
                                    >
                                    > Tim Haughton
                                    >
                                    > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Poole"
                                    > <cpoole@s...> wrote:
                                    > > I'm in the process of writing some tests for some new FORTRAN code
                                    > and I'm
                                    > > interested in finding out what people have done - if
                                    > anything - with
                                    > regards
                                    > > to unit testing of FORTRAN. I've seen some stuff from someone in
                                    > NASA who
                                    > > seems to be wrapping FORTRAN calls with Ruby in a home grown
                                    > framework and
                                    > > I've been working on using CppUnit and simply calling the
                                    > FORTRAN test
                                    > > methods from C++.
                                    > >
                                    > > Does anyone have any better suggestions?
                                    > >
                                    > > Charles Poole
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
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