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Hiring a magician

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  • Will Stott
    ... I ve experienced this sort of thing many times in job interviews over the years. The project manager (interviewer) is often desperately clutching at straws
    Message 1 of 3 , May 1 11:02 PM
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      >They wanted to learn testing, and I pitched "write lots of tests" in the
      >interview. Then I get onboard, and slowly learn that they don't want
      >to integrate testing into their build cycle. They only want the kind of
      >magic fairly land tests that prevent bugs even when you don't run them.

      I've experienced this sort of thing many times in job interviews over the
      years. The project manager (interviewer) is often desperately clutching at
      straws to save a failing project. The real job on offer is that of chief
      magician; someone who comes into a project and with a sprinkling of pixie
      dust fixes all the problems. It used to be a case of hiring a C++ programmer
      to rewrite a few VB components and fix the performance problems. I guess
      we're now seeing jobs for a TDD guy to write a few tests and fix the quality
      problems.

      Will
    • David Moskowitz
      I would have suggested that the real job can also be Chief Scapegoat if/when the effrots fail. Magician or scapegoat, neither one is an optimal position.
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2 11:55 AM
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        I would have suggested that the real job can also be Chief Scapegoat
        if/when the effrots fail. Magician or scapegoat, neither one is an
        optimal position.

        David

        On 5/2/05, Will Stott <will.stott@...> wrote:
        ...snip...
        > The real job on offer is that of chief magician; someone who
        > comes into a project and with a sprinkling of pixie dust fixes
        > all the problems.
        ...snip...
      • Willem Bogaerts
        ... I agree. The best thing you can practice as a Magician is the famous disappearing trick. Best regards, Willem Bogaerts
        Message 3 of 3 , May 2 12:27 PM
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          > I would have suggested that the real job can also be Chief Scapegoat
          > if/when the effrots fail. Magician or scapegoat, neither one is an
          > optimal position.

          I agree. The best thing you can practice as a Magician is the famous
          disappearing trick.

          Best regards,
          Willem Bogaerts
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