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RE: [XP] A Maturity Reference Model or Advice for Software Development Managers

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  • Steve Bate
    ... Marco, That s a good point. Everybody has their own perspective. I see truth in both what Gerry said and John wrote, just from different perspectives. I
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 8, 2005
      > From: Marco Dorantes [mailto:dorantesmarco@...]
      >
      > Yes, I have gotten to understand that; and from time to time, for a
      > few moments of despair in mind the idea of "the real world" become an
      > insurmountable barrier and all around turn a night without hope of
      > light.
      >
      > Then the light returns and the sun arise again in the inner space of
      > my skull because "the real world" is one of the most subjective
      > notions always attached to a single and particular view, that is to
      > say, "the real world" is in the eye of the observer and nowhere else;
      > so, the real world is what we choose it to be.

      Marco,

      That's a good point. Everybody has their own perspective. I see truth
      in both what Gerry said and John wrote, just from different
      perspectives.

      I recently saw an interesting online article called "Biases Affecting
      Information Processing." (http://www.virtualsalt.com/infobias.htm)
      It's not difficult to find many examples of these biases on this list
      and elsewhere. Of course, it's vastly easier to see the examples in
      /other/ people. ;-)

      These biases, in others and ourselves, would also be something to
      consider when attempting to bring organizational change, as in
      facilitating an organization to become more agile.

      I especially liked one of the bias descriptions...

      "A stable and sane personality requires that we have a pretty firm
      idea of what reality is like, causing us to reject ideas that
      do not conform with our sense of how things are. We tend to
      accept ideas that agree with our own beliefs and reject those
      that conflict. Of course, when we are wrong, we continue to
      reject what is true and continue to build a false world. Thus
      it is recommended that we examine our biases once a year, and
      always entertain the idea that we might be wrong in our beliefs."

      I think I'll add a annual information bias checkup to my calendar.

      Regards,

      Steve
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