Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Mindmapping [was XP, High Discipline, and Driving]

Expand Messages
  • Kent Beck
    Harald, I found the book Mapping Inner Space to be very helpful. The author s view of mindmaps is not at all something that could be computerized, not
    Message 1 of 88 , Jan 25, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Harald,

      I found the book "Mapping Inner Space" to be very helpful. The author's view
      of mindmaps is not at all something that could be computerized, not
      hierarchical, not linear. The initial descriptions in the book do have very
      rigid rules, but they are learning exercises not intended to be used when
      mapping "for real".

      The other experience that helped me "get" mindmaps was watching Francesco
      Cirillo at a workshop here in southern Oregon. The first draft map was
      always messy, and he would always take the time to redraw it. It seemed like
      much of the value was created in the redrawing step. That's where we would
      notice surprising connections, make important distinctions, and come
      together as a group in our understanding. I'm still at the stage where I
      treat redrawing as a chore that maybe could be avoided if I was just smart
      enough to draw the first one right. Francesco seems to be past that, to
      where he starts redrawing without internal resistance.

      You can find a couple of the maps I've drawn at
      http://www.threeriversinstitute.org/Extreme%20Programming%20in%20Pictures.ht
      m and in the second edition of XP Explained. I found mapping worth the
      effort. I am interested in your experience of it.


      Kent Beck
      Three Rivers Institute

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Harald M. Müller [mailto:harald.m.mueller@...]
      Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2005 5:34 AM
      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [XP] Re: XP, High Discipline, and Driving

      I (once again) want to try to put down my "holistic project
      knowledge" (or whatever you may call it) easily. Mind-mapping, IMO,
      is a nice 60s..80s idea which is completely hierarchical, rigid like
      a frozen waterfall, not at all adaptible and therefore hindering both
      thinking in the open mode; but as well in the close mode, because it
      does not lead to a clear structure or allows easy large re-thinking
      [refactoring of mind-maps, anyone?]
      (it's interesting that the 60s..80s were the time when also SW
      processes were designed and thought in this fashion).

      BUT if you read the metaphorical descriptions of it on the net - "non-
      linear thinking", "travel thru your mind", "explore the landscape of
      your thoughts", ..., ... -, you might conclude that this is obviously
      the best thing on the planet.
      [I am now going for "concept mapping" ... I hope to find Nirvana
      there ...]
    • Kent Beck
      Harald, I found the book Mapping Inner Space to be very helpful. The author s view of mindmaps is not at all something that could be computerized, not
      Message 88 of 88 , Jan 25, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Harald,

        I found the book "Mapping Inner Space" to be very helpful. The author's view
        of mindmaps is not at all something that could be computerized, not
        hierarchical, not linear. The initial descriptions in the book do have very
        rigid rules, but they are learning exercises not intended to be used when
        mapping "for real".

        The other experience that helped me "get" mindmaps was watching Francesco
        Cirillo at a workshop here in southern Oregon. The first draft map was
        always messy, and he would always take the time to redraw it. It seemed like
        much of the value was created in the redrawing step. That's where we would
        notice surprising connections, make important distinctions, and come
        together as a group in our understanding. I'm still at the stage where I
        treat redrawing as a chore that maybe could be avoided if I was just smart
        enough to draw the first one right. Francesco seems to be past that, to
        where he starts redrawing without internal resistance.

        You can find a couple of the maps I've drawn at
        http://www.threeriversinstitute.org/Extreme%20Programming%20in%20Pictures.ht
        m and in the second edition of XP Explained. I found mapping worth the
        effort. I am interested in your experience of it.


        Kent Beck
        Three Rivers Institute

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Harald M. Müller [mailto:harald.m.mueller@...]
        Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2005 5:34 AM
        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [XP] Re: XP, High Discipline, and Driving

        I (once again) want to try to put down my "holistic project
        knowledge" (or whatever you may call it) easily. Mind-mapping, IMO,
        is a nice 60s..80s idea which is completely hierarchical, rigid like
        a frozen waterfall, not at all adaptible and therefore hindering both
        thinking in the open mode; but as well in the close mode, because it
        does not lead to a clear structure or allows easy large re-thinking
        [refactoring of mind-maps, anyone?]
        (it's interesting that the 60s..80s were the time when also SW
        processes were designed and thought in this fashion).

        BUT if you read the metaphorical descriptions of it on the net - "non-
        linear thinking", "travel thru your mind", "explore the landscape of
        your thoughts", ..., ... -, you might conclude that this is obviously
        the best thing on the planet.
        [I am now going for "concept mapping" ... I hope to find Nirvana
        there ...]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.