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the Yoga of Software...

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  • Kay Pentecost
    Hi, Everybody, I was watching a video today on Ken Wilber s IntegralNaked site... it was about Karma Yoga, by Roger Walsh. It occurred to me that the nine
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 3, 2005
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      Hi, Everybody,

      I was watching a video today on Ken Wilber's IntegralNaked site... it was
      about Karma Yoga, by Roger Walsh.

      It occurred to me that the nine steps he gave have some value to XPers...
      that this is what we are already doing, as opposed to what the "average"
      programmer, or the code and fix team, and may be one reason for the
      disconnect when people react negatively to XP practices.

      Karma Yoga consists (in very general and inadequate terms) of dedicating
      what you do to a higher goal (traditionally offering it to God...) and
      releasing your attachment to the outcome. Walsh listed nine steps to this
      process:

      1. stopping what you're doing
      2. coming into the present moment
      3. setting your intention or dedicating the activity
      4. doing the activity as impeccably as you can
      5. bringing as much awareness as you possibly can into your experience
      and monitoring all the reactions that come up
      6. consciously working with the reactions
      7. attempting to release attachment to how things turn out
      8. taking time to reflect and learn on the whole process
      9. offering or dedicating the benefits to a higher goal.

      I'd like to comment some more on each of these... and I'm curious as to
      whether others see parallels to the XP/Agile mindset.


      Kay Pentecost
    • Dale Emery
      Hi Kay, ... YAGNI. Simplicity. ... YAGNI. The TDD microcycle. Simplicity. Courage. Communication. Respect. ... From large scope to small: Project
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 3, 2005
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        Hi Kay,

        > 1. stopping what you're doing

        YAGNI.

        Simplicity.

        > 2. coming into the present moment

        YAGNI. The TDD microcycle.

        Simplicity. Courage. Communication. Respect.

        > 3. setting your intention or dedicating the activity

        From large scope to small: Project chartering. The Planning
        Game. Story. Task. Test.

        Courage. Respect.

        > 4. doing the activity as impeccably as you can

        The rules of simplicity.

        Courage. Feedback. Communication. Respect.

        > 5. bringing as much awareness as you possibly can into your experience
        > and monitoring all the reactions that come up

        Test everything that could possibly break. Run all the tests.
        Acceptance tests.

        Short releases.

        Courage. Feedback. Communication. Respect.

        > 6. consciously working with the reactions

        Write the code that passes the test.

        Courage. Feedback. Communication. Respect.

        > 7. attempting to release attachment to how things turn out

        Refactoring.

        Courage. Feedback. Communication. Respect.

        > 8. taking time to reflect and learn on the whole process

        Courage. Feedback. Communication. Respect. Retrospectives.

        > 9. offering or dedicating the benefits to a higher goal.

        In every iteration, do the stories that provide the most business
        value.

        Sustainable pace.

        Courage. Feedback. Communication. Respect.

        Dale

        --
        Dale Emery, Consultant
        Inspiring Leadership for Software People
        Web: http://www.dhemery.com
        Weblog: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd

        The universe is like a safe to which there is a combination.
        Unfortunately, the combination is locked up inside the safe.
        --Peter de Vries
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