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Re: [XP] Asynchronous versus synchronous continuous integration

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  • Robert Watkins
    ... What CruiseControl fixes is leaving the system in an unknown state, either good or bad. It s an information source, which is good. It s also a safety
    Message 1 of 117 , Jan 1, 2005
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      Ron Jeffries wrote:
      > On Saturday, January 1, 2005, at 10:50:09 AM, Steve Berczuk wrote:
      >> - How often does the integration build fail when people check in
      >>changes only after a successful Private System Build/Test in their
      >>workspace?
      >
      > Occasionally. Each time is an "occasion" to reduce the chance of it
      > happening again. Common causes that I recall are:
      >
      > - someone integrated improperly before, left the system in an
      > unknown broken state. (yes, I know that Jason's approach, or
      > Cruise Control "fixes" this.)

      What CruiseControl "fixes" is leaving the system in an unknown state,
      either good or bad. It's an information source, which is good. It's also a
      safety net, which is good. Finally, it's a source of historical
      information: how often does the team integrate, and how often does it
      succeed. That's good too.

      Furthermore, there is nothing in CruiseControl which prohibits manual
      builds. In fact, you can even set up CruiseControl so that it only really
      does builds when prompted through the admin interface; on my current
      project, we have it set up exactly like that. Developers trigger builds on
      demand.

      Is it needed? No, of course not. Does it help? Well, it can. It's also a
      good way to step towards a continuous integration practice; by having an
      information radiator on how often the build gets broken, you can raise
      awareness within the team of how their "sloppy" practices impact others.

      Finally, in some teams, a dedicated build machine may not be possible to
      obtain because the management lives on a shoestring budget. A build server
      can be shared.

      --
      "Software is too expensive to build cheaply"
      Robert Watkins http://twasink.net/ robertdw@...
    • Chris Dollin
      ... I have learnt the hard way the following rule: never check significant modifications in (in our case, to SourceForge) ten minutes before going home time on
      Message 117 of 117 , Jan 18, 2005
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        On Monday 17 January 2005 17:26, Jeff Grigg wrote:
        > > --- Robert Watkins wrote:
        > >> Personally, I find long builds offensive, _even if they
        > >> aren't causing me any pain_. The "Build Successful"
        > >> message is feedback, and I want to reduce the time that
        > >> feedback takes to arrive.
        >
        > --- Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@X...> wrote:
        > > In what way are they offensive?
        >
        > Let's say it's Friday. At 5:23 P.M. I just checked in my changes
        > and I want to go home. But what if it takes Cruise Control 15
        > minutes to run all the tests? Should I wait until it completes,
        > confirming that my changes were good, before I leave for the
        > weekend? What if it takes half an hour? What if it takes an hour?

        I have learnt the hard way the following rule: never check significant
        modifications in (in our case, to SourceForge) ten minutes before
        going home time on a Friday, or indeed any other day of the week.
        Because, even if all the tests pass, even if you updated just recently,
        *that* will be when you forgot to cvs-add the new tiny class, and when
        the connection to SF is taking place along a stretch of salty string,
        and the fetch-code-into-paranoia-directory step takes forever, and
        *then* you discover there's a problem, and you've come in by train
        not car so an extra ten minutes isn't fatter traffic-jams and twenty
        minutes extra on the commute, it's getting home an *hour* later ...

        --
        Chris "electric hedgehog" Dollin
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