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16827Re: [XP] who do your pair with?

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  • Dossy
    Dec 1, 2000
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      On 2000.12.01, C. J. M. Booth <cjmb@...> wrote:
      > There are quite a few people who regularly/frequently post in this
      > group who seem to be the only ones who post from their company/domain.
      [ ... ]
      > As far as I can tell, all these people give sound advice, and make
      > thoughtful comments based on their experience. Yet we never seem to
      > hear from those that they pair with. I wonder why that is. Would any
      > of you care to explain, please. (I suspect that the explanation might
      > make some reference to the difference between introverts and
      > extroverts.)

      Hi, Chris! Thanks for mentioning me!

      I guess the short answer is: until recently, I was a closet XP'er.

      For many years, I've done most of the practices of XP. I did them
      because they came naturally. They produced the best results. They
      made the customer happy. I didn't have a name for my methodology,
      which made some people edgy but results speak for themselves.

      I never called it "pair programming" but I've always found working
      closely with someone else (whether it be the customer to determine
      requirements, or another developer to accomplish goals) worked
      better than doing things in a vacuum only to later find out of the
      edges of the two puzzles fit together.

      On the "smart people continuum" I'm somewhere near the bottom - I read
      very little, I barely study, and I can't keep too many ideas organized
      in my head at once. My abilities forced me to adopt a method of
      working that let me accomplish the most with the little resources
      I had: I make lots of small changes, and make sure that after each
      one, nothing broke. If I got sloppy and made multiple changes, I
      usually found myself having to back them all out and then applying
      one at a time until I found what broke, anyhow.

      Because I integrated often, in XP terms, I considered an iteration
      to be a day long. At the beginning of my day, I'd look at the
      outstanding tasks as prioritized by my customer and would figure
      out how many of them I could get done by the end of the day. I'd
      do them, and integrate them - the customer always saw progress,
      and was always happy with this. They felt like every day they
      were paying for has been well spent. (XP talks about iterations
      a bit longer, which probably works better for projects with more
      people - but I wonder if anyone else here uses or have tried
      iterations of one or two days long.)


      Then, I came across the XP white book and said "wow, validation
      for what I've been doing!" It's given me the courage to, of
      sorts, come "out of the closet" about my XP. I actually refer
      to things as being XP-like now, and have convinced some folks
      to read some of the XP books. I've got one of my "business
      customers" reading the XP green book, and he has since gotten
      copies of it for all of his people. By the middle of 2001,
      I want to make the white and pink books "required reading" for
      all of our developers here.


      Now, to answer your question about why only I post from my
      company? Panoptic Computer Network is a company of one - me.
      It's the company I started to do all my freelance work under,
      and to keep "my stuff" seperate from "my employer's stuff".

      Now, I'm currently employed by one of the world's largest
      educational publishers (I don't want to say which... feel
      free to send guesses to me in private email if you like)
      which is where I've really been applying XP. Until working
      here, I've only done the "informal XP" that I describe
      earlier in the email.

      Why am I the only one posting from *that* company? Because
      everyone else spends their time surfing the web rather
      than subscribing to mailing lists? Maybe they don't
      know about this mailing list, or mailing lists in general.
      Maybe they're all busy forwarding joke emails to their
      friends and family. I have no idea.


      > PS Another question: do you folks talk over any of your postings with
      > your pairs?

      Oh no, never! I wouldn't want them to know that I tell stories
      about them to bunch of strangers! They might not want to pair
      anymore if they knew I was off talking about what we'd done,
      haha.

      I do bring back what I learn on this list to the folks I work
      with, so in the end my organization does benefit, but I never
      mention what comes from my posts vs. others ...

      Maybe I should. But then, maybe they'd realize we were doing
      XP, and would start to resist. I think it's better the way
      things are ... ;-) ;-)

      - Dossy

      --
      Dossy Shiobara mail: dossy@...
      Panoptic Computer Network web: http://www.panoptic.com/
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