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106643RE: [XP] Re: Recognizing when your project is headed for disaster?

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  • Steven Gordon
    May 3, 2005
      "anti-semitic refactoring"??

      -----Original Message-----
      From: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com on behalf of twifkak@...
      Sent: Tue 5/3/2005 7:48 AM
      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      Cc:
      Subject: Re: [XP] Re: Recognizing when your project is headed for disaster?



      Thanks for your reply, Jeff. I feel like I'm all take and no give on this list. :)

      replies below..

      > --- Jeff Grigg wrote:
      > >>>> So I joined the project, and saved it.
      > >>> How, may I ask?
      > In part, by being a truly amazing C++ architect, developer, mentor,
      > and technical lead. (...and modest too!!! ;-> :-)
      See, I wonder how much this is an effect on these XP success stories. I know it's been said before, but I wanna try out the words for myself: The sort of people who are on this list are good programmers. Not necessarily experts at this library or that language, but the kind of people who read and learn and synthesize and continue to strive for self-improvement (and use polysyndetons to make a point), which are some of the very traits necessary to write good code.

      To an extent, I think part of that success is that when it is said a developer writes "good code," it means he is more experienced at predicting the future of the code, so the code he writes reflects that through maintainability.

      To a greater extent, though, I think the developer succeeds at applying TDD and iterative development and anti-semitic refactoring because he was always good at picking up new things and learning them quickly, and was always the type to excel when given a tight feedback loop.

      Then again, I should read one of the myriad of XP books out there and shut the heck up until so.

      > Aside from personal productivity and teamwork, what really made
      > success possible was aggressive iterative development and delivery
      > of functionality, similar to XP User Stories. And automated
      > regression testing (but not full XP Test Driven Development).
      > Intense teamwork and communication in a war room environment was
      > very helpful too.
      OK. I have no comments here. Always interesting to see what bag of tricks people bring to a project. :) It helps me build ideas on what my own bag of tricks should be. (As I'm no XP coach, I'm going to have to pick some subset, at first.)

      > We had to prove that we could develop working software quickly. And
      > that it would actually work, and solve some business problems. And
      > we needed confidence in our estimates (our Velocity), as we were
      > working against the year 2000 deadline. Fortunately, we managed to
      > achieve a much higher velocity than I or anyone else had expected,
      > without which we would have had no hope of meeting the deadline.
      Cool.
      1)You measured velocity via those pseudo-user stories you mentioned, I take it?
      2)How did you develop it quickly, but maintain quality? Was automated regression testing enough? Did iterative development prove to help you write quality code? Did you find that the "war room environment" was adequate to communicate the dependencies between different people's code, or were problems discovered after the fact?

      > The technical issues were not the only project problems. I give our
      > project leadership full credit for resolving a later political
      > crisis between the I.T. department and external vendors that
      > threatened to derail the whole project.
      Way to insert that little bit of token modesty, there. (Just kidding! Don't hurt me.)

      Thanks,
      Devin


      > --- Jeff Grigg wrote:
      > >>>> So I joined the project, and saved it.
      >
      > >> --- Devin Mullins wrote:
      > >>> How, may I ask?
      >
      > In part, by being a truly amazing C++ architect, developer, mentor,
      > and technical lead. (...and modest too!!! ;-> :-)
      >
      > Aside from personal productivity and teamwork, what really made
      > success possible was aggressive iterative development and delivery
      > of functionality, similar to XP User Stories. And automated
      > regression testing (but not full XP Test Driven Development).
      > Intense teamwork and communication in a war room environment was
      > very helpful too.
      >
      > We had to prove that we could develop working software quickly. And
      > that it would actually work, and solve some business problems. And
      > we needed confidence in our estimates (our Velocity), as we were
      > working against the year 2000 deadline. Fortunately, we managed to
      > achieve a much higher velocity than I or anyone else had expected,
      > without which we would have had no hope of meeting the deadline.
      >
      >
      > The technical issues were not the only project problems. I give our
      > project leadership full credit for resolving a later political
      > crisis between the I.T. department and external vendors that
      > threatened to derail the whole project.








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