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Re: [extremeperl] FUD Starts Early

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  • Mark A. Hershberger
    ... What a coincidence! I write on my weblog by typing text in emacs and typing C-c C-c! (weblogger.el is my secret weapon.) /me ducks -- http://hexmode.com/
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 13, 2006
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      apv wrote:
      > On Monday, March 13, 2006, at 12:01 PM, Rob Nagler wrote:
      >
      >> Thanks. No, I don't blog. I find it much easier to write text in
      >> Emacs and type C-c C-c. :-)
      >>

      What a coincidence! I write on my weblog by typing text in emacs and
      typing C-c C-c! (weblogger.el is my secret weapon.)

      /me ducks

      --
      http://hexmode.com/
      GPG Fingerprint: 7E15 362D A32C DFAB E4D2 B37A 735E F10A 2DFC BFF5

      In the end, the only events in life worth telling are those in which
      the imperishable world erupted into this transitory world. --Carl Jung





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    • Greg C
      Hey Rob, you aughta blog. Another interesting read is Douglas Rushkoff s Coercion
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 15, 2006
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        Hey Rob, you aughta blog.

        Another interesting read is Douglas Rushkoff's "Coercion"
        http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/157322829X/qid=1142457712/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-4854033-0932710?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

        He talks about how FUD is used in marketing, but really effective marketing
        goes beyond that, attempting to instill in the "customer" the notion that the
        only relief from their fear is in the use of a particular product.

        Perhaps there's not a lot of difference between the way the Patriot Act has
        been sold to the American public, and the way mouthwash is sold.

        Greg


        --- Rob Nagler <nagler@...> wrote:

        > I'm half way through the War of Art by Steve Pressfield, and I'm a bit
        > shocked at his approach. I'm in the section where he explains
        > Resistance as the thing that blocks creative people. He's a writer,
        > and writes fiction, normally. The middle of the book will explain how
        > to "Turn Pro". I already have an idea of what that means through his
        > talk about psychology. Frankly, it's unenlightened ihimo.
        >
        > FUD is Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt. It's a marketing technique.

        [...]


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      • Rob Nagler
        ... In a way I do. It s not fancy like other blogs, and it is communal, instead of me, it s we . The nice thing about this blog is that is short and to the
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 18, 2006
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          Greg C writes:
          > Hey Rob, you aughta blog.

          In a way I do. It's not fancy like other blogs, and it is communal,
          instead of me, it's "we". The nice thing about this blog is that is
          short and to the point, and gives the programming community something
          they usually don't get with other blogs. Scroll down to the word
          CHANGES:

          http://petshop.bivio.biz/src?s=Bivio::bOP

          Rob
        • Rob Nagler
          ... Since there s been an overwhelming demand for a blog, and since this list has been getting more noise than signal lately (those buggers registered a bunch
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 18, 2006
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            Mark A. Hershberger writes:
            > What a coincidence! I write on my weblog by typing text in emacs and
            > typing C-c C-c! (weblogger.el is my secret weapon.)

            :-)

            Since there's been an overwhelming demand for a blog, and since this
            list has been getting more noise than signal lately (those buggers
            registered a bunch of addresses a while ago, and are using them. I'm
            tempted to kill all .in and .cn addresses in attempt to stop the
            blight, but I digress...), I'll write a bit more about a recent bOP
            change. FYI, I am writing this as much for bivions as for the OSS
            community, just like I write code for my customers as much as for the
            programming community...

            I added a Wiki (per a customer request, of course :-) to bOP this
            week. I also added a feature that allows our customer to use the Wiki
            to write help text. WikiView.pm outputs XHTML, and the customer can
            control the L&F by adding a base.css to the wiki directory. And yes,
            as with everything in bOP, each Realm can have its own Wiki.

            In the process of creating the Wiki, I was trying to figure out why
            blogs, wikis, etc. are interesting. They are all CMS technologies and
            they compete with each other. In bOP, they work together. To create
            a blog, all you'd have to do is render the RealmFiles in a Table
            ordered by date with WikiView. A blog is a chronological wiki. A
            wiki is a blog with clear and uniform naming.

            The way I see it, Wikis, blogs, html, etc. are an attempt at
            decoupling the content from the presentation. It's a problem the
            software industry has been repeatedly solving since at least the
            1960s. It's really not that complex a problem -- hence the
            re-inventions. It seems to me that programmers like solving simple
            problems with complex solutions, because it's too hard to actually
            write and re-use good abstractions. It's one of the reasons why CSS
            is so messed up even though there were innumerable better solutions to
            the problem of decoupling formatting from content prior to the
            invention of CSS, but I digress again...

            Why did I write my own wiki? Blogs and wikis get one thing wrong that
            bOP gets right: groupware. They focus on the content creation and
            naming, which is a trival problem, and they often do a bad job at it
            imiho. weblogger.el seems like an odd mix of bad ideas, too. Why
            does it use XML-RPC, when WebDAV has been around longer and is
            supported by more web servers?

            The two problems CMSes solve that general groupware systems don't
            solve: naming and formatting. Groupware sometimes handles formatting,
            but the point of groupware is to solve the
            security-for-shared-resources problem. In other words, good groupware
            gives the appropriate access to files and other communications to
            people in a group. The formatting problem is something that you throw
            on top of groupware, because people do need to format their content
            every now and then. CMSes also handle versioning, but that's not the
            topic I'd like to talk about today, and it really is distinct from
            naming and formatting.

            Assuming you've solved the file access problem, you'll use those
            abstractions for the Wiki so all I have to think about is naming and
            formatting. Naming in Wikis is just fine. CamelCase works, and I
            just used that. You also want to match email addresses, domain names,
            and local file references, and so one. In our wiki, you refer to an
            image in the wiki folder by naming it, e.g mypicture.jpg. The wiki
            formatter turns it into an <img> link just as it turns emails into
            mailto's. (This is a private wiki so we don't care about hiding
            addresses, and if we needed to, we could make the mailto: be a local
            form email so the address doesn't get public.)

            The general formatting problem is interesting. Just like this email,
            I use blank lines for paragraph delimiters. I also allowed _italics_
            and *bold*, but that's it. I didn't want to invent my own formatting
            language, and I wanted to keep the essence of a wiki which is: it's
            the content stupid. If you want to format, use HTML, Illustrator, or
            TeX.

            I tried to avoid the introduction of syntax for names of things,
            because an interpreter can easily discern between the many types of
            external objects we need to name and ordinary natural language.

            I do know my customer wants bulleted lists, and a few other things
            like strikeout and underline. I also know that with a collaborative
            mechanism, there would be a price to pay if the syntax was not easily
            usable by experts in HTML, and at the same time, understood by
            people who don't like matching up angle brackets and tags so here's
            what I came up with:

            @ul
            @li The syntax uses html tags so I didn't invent the names.
            @li Similar tags close each other like good ole HTML 1.0.
            @li Tags must begin at the start of a line so @perlvar is not treated specially.
            @li
            Only formatting tags were included, not @form, and @script,
            This wiki is about content, which can be inserted in places,
            and can link to the main HelpWikiHelp.
            @ul

            The wiki interpretation code is in a single 280 line module:

            http://www.bivio.biz/f/bOP/lib/Bivio/Type/WikiText.pm

            And since this an XP lists, here's the unit test:

            http://www.bivio.biz/f/bOP/tests/Bivio/Type/t/WikiText.bunit

            I hope those of you have read this far have found this useful. It's
            the type of stuff that doesn't appear in code, and shouldn't. It's
            not the type of stuff I can spend my time on, because I'm a much
            better coder, and I strongly believe programmers learn the most by
            trying to figure out abstractions rather than reading about them.
            However, I thought I'd try this for a change and see what feedback I
            get. :-)

            Rob
          • mah@everybody.org
            ... Why would people want to publish a weblog using Blogger s services? Whatever the reason that is why blogger.el was written to use XML-RPC. weblogger.el
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 19, 2006
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              Rob Nagler <nagler@...> writes:

              > weblogger.el seems like an odd mix of bad ideas, too. Why
              > does it use XML-RPC, when WebDAV has been around longer and is
              > supported by more web servers?

              Why would people want to publish a weblog using Blogger's services?
              Whatever the reason that is why blogger.el was written to use
              XML-RPC. weblogger.el built on blogger.el's work to support the
              MetaWeblog API that many weblog frameworks (e.g. LiveJournal,
              Wordpress) support.

              If you would rather write a bunch of static files to the server, then
              other Emacs-based solutions exist:

              - BlogMax (http://www.billstclair.com/blogmax/blogmax.el)

              - Planner.el (http://www.plannerlove.com/) Sacha Chua maintains
              planner.el and uses it to publish her weblo
              to integrate her del.icio.us tags with her journal entries that she
              then publishes on her weblog.

              And there are others....

              Mark.

              --
              http://hexmode.com/
              GPG Fingerprint: 7E15 362D A32C DFAB E4D2 B37A 735E F10A 2DFC BFF5

              In the end, the only events in life worth telling are those in which
              the imperishable world erupted into this transitory world. --Carl Jung


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