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Re: [extremeperl] Better Development Tools for Perl

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  • J Matisse Enzer
    ... Hello Alex, and thanks for jumping in! I was feeling kind of lonely :-) ... I agree of course - I am arguing for improving our tools in a certain
    Message 1 of 107 , Jun 16, 2005
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      On Jun 16, 2005, at 8:36 AM, Alex Kapranoff wrote:
      >
      > I watched this thread closely and wondered how can someone critisize
      > an app that does not exist for missing features. That's just strange.
      >

      Hello Alex, and thanks for jumping in! I was feeling kind of lonely :-)

      > would you mind an auto-refactoring addon
      > for your current editor? I guest nobody would. Why? Features can be
      > added to software in an unobtrusive manner.

      I agree of course - I am arguing for improving our tools in a certain
      direction. I would prefer that these features be available in every
      editor that exists :-)

      I use vim myself, although as you can tell I have switched to
      Eclipse/EPIC for many situations. I certainly intend to keep using
      vi/vim in many cases - having many tools that can do the job is a good
      thing.

      As I understand Rob's point of view he feels that the features I have
      been advocating undermine the strengths of Perl and will hurt the Perl
      community by getting people to avoid some of Perl's most powerful
      features such as the ability to dynamic generate methods, alter the
      symbol tables, etc.

      Obviously I feel differently - I feel that without easy access to an
      integrated toolset that includes say 75% of the following, that Perl
      will fade as a viable language for medium/large projects:

      Many of these already exist for Perl (but some do not) and the really
      important point is that it needs to be really easy for a developer, or
      group of developers to adopt a toolset that provides most of this list
      - if it takes them 2 weeks to get it all integrated that is too much
      for many commercial operations - thewy need to be up and running with
      the toolset in a couple of days, maybe with a one-day training if the
      tool is totally new.

      This is where the "Integrated" part of IDE is really important -
      putting many tools together in a single environment that is installed
      more or less all at once.

      Here's a list of features that I think we need to have 70-80% of in a
      tool to "catch up" to other languages in a commercial, large project
      environment:

      * Syntax-coloring text editor.
      * Syntax-checking - catch and display syntax errors as you type.
      * Version control integration - checkout and compare code using
      CVS, subversion, etc.
      * Excellent refactoring support
      * Bug/Request tracking tool.
      Ideally integrated with the source control system:
      Put a bug number in a check-in note and it automatically
      creates links in the project web pages (Perforce does this.)
      * Support for creating and running unit tests.
      * Code generation, create commonly used stub code.
      * Code-assist editor (e.g. get a menu of methods when you type in
      an object reference.)
      * Language-specific help (click on a keyword and the
      language-specific help is available)
      * Managing of dependencies between code files, packages, etc.
      * Debugger - run your code under a debugger with real-time display
      of results
      * Automatic reformatting of code.
      * Automatically build and test.
      * Performance profiler.
      * Some kind of networked, shared note-taking (e.g. a Wiki)
      * Ability to choose tabbed or floating display of resource windows.
      * "Tree" view of source files and resources.
      * Automatic email notice when other people commit code to the
      repository.

      -------------------------------------------------------
      Matisse Enzer <matisse@...>
      http://www.matisse.net/ - http://www.eigenstate.net/
      415-225-6703 (work/cellphone)
      415-401-8325 (home)
    • Siegfried Heintze
      Since there was a helpful discussion some time ago on USB keyboards and mice for pair programming that was not specific to perl, I wanted to solicit the group
      Message 107 of 107 , Feb 13, 2006
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        Since there was a helpful discussion some time ago on USB keyboards and mice
        for pair programming that was not specific to perl, I wanted to solicit the
        group for information on network software (also not specific to perl).



        I just set up openVPN on my openwrt/WRT54G router for pair programming with
        a headset and skype.



        (1) Can any point me to the documentation on sharing desktops on windows? I
        need to create accounts on Win2003 XP Server. When I created an account
        belonging only to the user group, my partner could not log in. He was
        receiving some error message about not being permitted to log in
        interactively. However, when I added the administrator group (reluctantly)
        to his account, he could log in. Is there a tutorial somewhere on the web
        for creating user accounts in windows for use with remote desktop logins on
        VPNs?



        (2) How do I share my remote desktop setting with a programming pair
        partner?



        (3) What about sharing sessions when I'm booted with linux? I think there is
        a vnc program out there, but I don't know how to use it. I'll need to learn
        how to create accounts and share linux desktops with remote VPN users. Is
        there a tutorial on this?



        (4) Are video cams very helpful for pair programming?



        It seems that this kind of knowledge would be very common for pair
        programmers.



        Thanks,

        Siegfried



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