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Re: [extremeperl] Better Development Tools for Perl

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  • Rob Kinyon
    ... So, what you re saying is that any large scale project in Perl requires a senior-level developer. I would agree, and take it further - a large scale
    Message 1 of 107 , Jun 9, 2005
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      > I do see an issue that needs to be addressed - wizard-level perl
      > abilities have a very high cost of entry; to do massive perl projects
      > without them requires either an IDE or a massive amount of effort;

      So, what you're saying is that any large scale project in Perl
      requires a senior-level developer. I would agree, and take it further
      - a large scale project in any language requires a senior-level
      developer knowledgable in that language.

      Screw it - a large scale project in ANY human domain of endeavor
      requires someone who is master-level in both said domain of endeavor
      as well as the toolset being used to complete the project. You
      wouldn't build a bridge without an engineer with experience building
      bridges in the style you want built, would you? So, why on earth is it
      OK to spend the same amount of money on a project with the same impact
      on your business without a senior level developer?!?

      I don't care if it's Perl, Java, or COBOL. You need a senior-level
      developer experienced in that toolset on your team. Period.

      > IDEs tend to be obstacles to attaining wizard-level perl abilities (although
      > the IDE may allow the coder to think they've attained wizard level).

      This just reinforces what I'm saying above. In the old guild system,
      you had masters, journeymen, and apprentices. Apprentices were never
      allowed to use anything but the most basic of tools. In fact, in many
      crafts, they had to build their own tools in order to leave their
      apprenticehood and become journeymen. Apprenticeship usually lasted
      between 4 and 8 years, depending on the craft.

      Journeymen were people who showed a decent level of skill in the
      craft. They were good enough to charge money for their skills, but
      weren't considered good enough to teach others. They often had to
      journey until they found a town/village where they could ply their
      trade without too much competition. In essence, they were proving
      themselves.

      Masters were the ones you wanted building your castle. You wouldn't
      hire a journeyman to build your castle or pallisade or whatever ...
      not if you wanted it to last more than a day of siege. You hired a
      master. The master would bring along a few journeymen and apprentices,
      to help out. But, the master was in charge.

      > I do think a certain level of IDE support is useful; I suspect that level
      > can be added to both Emacs and vim via their extension support, and
      > most of it already has, albeit in a half-dozen assorted extensions with
      > no integration. However, most of the IDE features I've seen are more
      > geared towards compensating for bad coding practices.

      I can see that kind of consolidation being useful. Maybe, it would be
      nice to have two projects on sourceforge - the Vim and Emacs Perl IDE
      extensions. I have a few requests:
      1) Every single extension needs to be enabled or disabled through the
      editor's config file
      2) All the parameters need to be in the editor's config file
      3) As many extensions as possible need to be usable from basic version
      and not the GUI version
      4) The extension should not be required to edit the code. (This
      removes things like source files stored without whitespace and run
      through perltidy right before editing.)

      Rob
    • Siegfried Heintze
      Since there was a helpful discussion some time ago on USB keyboards and mice for pair programming that was not specific to perl, I wanted to solicit the group
      Message 107 of 107 , Feb 13, 2006
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        Since there was a helpful discussion some time ago on USB keyboards and mice
        for pair programming that was not specific to perl, I wanted to solicit the
        group for information on network software (also not specific to perl).



        I just set up openVPN on my openwrt/WRT54G router for pair programming with
        a headset and skype.



        (1) Can any point me to the documentation on sharing desktops on windows? I
        need to create accounts on Win2003 XP Server. When I created an account
        belonging only to the user group, my partner could not log in. He was
        receiving some error message about not being permitted to log in
        interactively. However, when I added the administrator group (reluctantly)
        to his account, he could log in. Is there a tutorial somewhere on the web
        for creating user accounts in windows for use with remote desktop logins on
        VPNs?



        (2) How do I share my remote desktop setting with a programming pair
        partner?



        (3) What about sharing sessions when I'm booted with linux? I think there is
        a vnc program out there, but I don't know how to use it. I'll need to learn
        how to create accounts and share linux desktops with remote VPN users. Is
        there a tutorial on this?



        (4) Are video cams very helpful for pair programming?



        It seems that this kind of knowledge would be very common for pair
        programmers.



        Thanks,

        Siegfried



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