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Re: [extremeperl] Book: Higher Order Perl

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  • Curtis Poe
    ... Which points to a sticky problem in my line of reasoning: I was arguing two points. One, Nagler claims that one doesn t need to learn languages in other
    Message 1 of 58 , Apr 7, 2005
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      On Apr 7, 2005, at 12:49 PM, Tom Vilot wrote:

      > I generally have found that most programming projects are dictated by
      > the available resource and the bias of that pool of people, not by the
      > "ideal" language for a given problem.

      Which points to a sticky problem in my line of reasoning: I was
      arguing two points. One, Nagler claims that one doesn't need to learn
      languages in other paradigms to truly understand those paradigms. I
      tend to disagree (while it's possible, I think it tends not to happen
      in the real world. Witness "OO" Java and how many practitioners write
      it.)

      The other point being the utility of various languages. We should
      remember that SQL is a language. No one thinks twice about embedding
      SQL in their Perl. We don't *have* to do this. We can write
      everything out to flat files and have Perl parse it, but SQL and
      relational databases are so useful that they've gained widespread
      popularity. If you need raw performance, you can drop to C and embed
      it in your Perl code. Need a pretty front end? You might use HTML or
      wxPerl.

      One project I worked on combined Perl, SQL, JavaScript, HTML, XUL, and
      C. Programmers use a multitude of languages all the time and they use
      languages that are better suited to what they need to do.
      Theoretically, that project could have provided a command line
      interface and flat-files and been our holy grail of Pure Perl. It
      would have sucked, too.

      Cheers,
      Ovid

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tom Vilot
      ... Wait. That sounds like Rob .... ;c) (kidding) ... Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ... ... (not kidding!)
      Message 58 of 58 , Apr 8, 2005
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        Greg C wrote:

        >
        >
        > Consider: projects A and B have identical goals. In project A, you
        > have free
        > rein in your choice of software and hardware tools. However, the
        > manager sets
        > arbitrary deadlines, likes to stand behind people and criticize their
        > code as
        > they type,


        Wait. That sounds like Rob ....
        ;c) (kidding)

        > On project B, the choice of langauge and hardware are made for you and
        > there's
        > only one computer per two programmers. On the other hand, the manager
        > sees his
        > people as people, negotiates requirements and schedules on a realistic
        > basis,
        > trusts his people, follows a set of best practices (be it XP or some
        > other) and
        > chases everyone out of the office at 5:30.


        Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ...

        :c)

        (not kidding!)
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