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Re: [extremeperl] Book: Higher Order Perl

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  • Rob Nagler
    ... If you buy into refactoring, your code can be that way, too. ... I doubt it. I put a premium on problem solving, whatever the problem. I hate repeating
    Message 1 of 58 , Mar 30, 2005
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      Terrence Brannon writes:
      > *YOU* have very little to learn because your Perl code is very
      > type-oriented and every expression in every line is super tight with
      > no excess state laying around.

      If you buy into refactoring, your code can be that way, too.

      > You use Perl in a very functional way because you place a premium on
      > declarative thinking, probably due to your background in Electronics.

      I doubt it. I put a premium on problem solving, whatever the
      problem. I hate repeating myself, especially when it comes to finding
      the same bug over and over again.

      > But Perl does not enforce the standards for coding that you employ. It
      > adds 5 and 5.0 just as happily as 5 and 5. etc etc.

      I believe you need lots of discipline to program. If you believe that
      purely functional programming is the best way to satisfy your
      customers, you program that way, in any language, even if all you have
      is an assembler. No language or methodology is going to protect the
      customer from undisciplined programmers.

      Rob
    • Tom Vilot
      ... Wait. That sounds like Rob .... ;c) (kidding) ... Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ... ... (not kidding!)
      Message 58 of 58 , Apr 8, 2005
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        Greg C wrote:

        >
        >
        > Consider: projects A and B have identical goals. In project A, you
        > have free
        > rein in your choice of software and hardware tools. However, the
        > manager sets
        > arbitrary deadlines, likes to stand behind people and criticize their
        > code as
        > they type,


        Wait. That sounds like Rob ....
        ;c) (kidding)

        > On project B, the choice of langauge and hardware are made for you and
        > there's
        > only one computer per two programmers. On the other hand, the manager
        > sees his
        > people as people, negotiates requirements and schedules on a realistic
        > basis,
        > trusts his people, follows a set of best practices (be it XP or some
        > other) and
        > chases everyone out of the office at 5:30.


        Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ...

        :c)

        (not kidding!)
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