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Re: [extremeperl] Book: Higher Order Perl

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  • Terrence Brannon
    ... Autrijus recent perl.com interview echoes this. He solved a binary-file parsing problem in Haskell, creating a solution that scales linearly. Autrijus
    Message 1 of 58 , Mar 30, 2005
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      Adam Turoff <adam.turoff@...> writes:

      >
      > Here are some other goals for learning a new language:
      > - learn how to say more with less code
      > - become more productive

      Autrijus' recent perl.com interview echoes this. He solved a
      binary-file parsing problem in Haskell, creating a solution that scales
      linearly. Autrijus also points out some serious performace weaknesses,
      limitations, and absences from Perl:

      <quotes src=http://www.perl.com/pub/a/2005/03/03/pugs_interview.html>

      Perl 5 is doomed because it has no COW - Copy-on-Write

      Using Haskell to develop OpenAFP.hs led to programs that eat constant
      2MB memory, scale linearly, and are generally 2OOM faster than my Perl
      library.

      Oh, and the code size is 1/10.



      </quote>

      --
      Carter's Compass: I know I'm on the right track when,
      by deleting something, I'm adding functionality.
    • Tom Vilot
      ... Wait. That sounds like Rob .... ;c) (kidding) ... Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ... ... (not kidding!)
      Message 58 of 58 , Apr 8, 2005
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        Greg C wrote:

        >
        >
        > Consider: projects A and B have identical goals. In project A, you
        > have free
        > rein in your choice of software and hardware tools. However, the
        > manager sets
        > arbitrary deadlines, likes to stand behind people and criticize their
        > code as
        > they type,


        Wait. That sounds like Rob ....
        ;c) (kidding)

        > On project B, the choice of langauge and hardware are made for you and
        > there's
        > only one computer per two programmers. On the other hand, the manager
        > sees his
        > people as people, negotiates requirements and schedules on a realistic
        > basis,
        > trusts his people, follows a set of best practices (be it XP or some
        > other) and
        > chases everyone out of the office at 5:30.


        Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ...

        :c)

        (not kidding!)
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