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Re: [extremeperl] Book: Higher Order Perl

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  • Rob Nagler
    ... I came across it on Perl Monks, because I was specifically looking for it. If I happened to be trying to figure out how to solve a problem, I might head
    Message 1 of 58 , Mar 29, 2005
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      Adam Turoff writes:
      > How does that disprove David's point?
      >
      > Ovid is doing a Prolog implementation in Perl. If you don't know
      > anything about logic programming, a Prolog implementation in Perl
      > won't help you very much.

      I came across it on Perl Monks, because I was specifically looking for
      it. If I happened to be trying to figure out how to solve a problem,
      I might head there to ask a question or just browse. The point is
      that my community led me there just as Higher Order Perl led me to
      this discussion. :-)

      > A valid analogy would be: both English and Latin have a subjunctive mood;
      > the subjunctive isn't used widely in English, so if you want to understand
      > the subjunctive, learn Latin. (Note that this has nothing to do with
      > studying Roman history or reading Ovid[1]).

      LOL. :-)

      > Basically, you are saying you are happy dealing with functional
      > programming in translation.

      Yup.

      > That's fine. Knock yourself out. But that doesn't address the fact
      > that functional programming in Perl loses something in translation.
      > It may be subtle, or it may be significant, but *something* is lost.

      I think one loses what one simply cannot comprehend without repetition
      and hard work in any language.

      Rob
    • Tom Vilot
      ... Wait. That sounds like Rob .... ;c) (kidding) ... Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ... ... (not kidding!)
      Message 58 of 58 , Apr 8 9:37 AM
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        Greg C wrote:

        >
        >
        > Consider: projects A and B have identical goals. In project A, you
        > have free
        > rein in your choice of software and hardware tools. However, the
        > manager sets
        > arbitrary deadlines, likes to stand behind people and criticize their
        > code as
        > they type,


        Wait. That sounds like Rob ....
        ;c) (kidding)

        > On project B, the choice of langauge and hardware are made for you and
        > there's
        > only one computer per two programmers. On the other hand, the manager
        > sees his
        > people as people, negotiates requirements and schedules on a realistic
        > basis,
        > trusts his people, follows a set of best practices (be it XP or some
        > other) and
        > chases everyone out of the office at 5:30.


        Wait. That *also* sounds like Rob ...

        :c)

        (not kidding!)
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