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  • Then why not just say that anxiety or anguish causes dizziness. Why use the device of an intermediate level ... anguish = vertigo = dizziness. eduard -----Original Message----- From: Mary Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 2:05 PM To: existlist@^$1 Subject: [existlist] vertigo vs. acrophobia Apparently the anxiety caused by severe acrophobia can cause dizziness, hence a possible...
    eduardathome Jul 26, 2013
  • The difficulty is the use of a word which has a specific meaning elsewhere. Vertigo is a sense of imbalance or room spinning that is brought on by a physical condition. Perhaps a malfunction of the inner ear or loss of oxygen to the brain. Acrophobia may well have been a more appropriate term. Sartre is using a different definition of the term ... "Vertigo is anguish to the extent...
    eduardathome Jul 26, 2013
  • It is being realistic, considering that people [as you say] have been arguing about this for 70 years. The poor waiter may just like being a waiter. But now we are going to provide him with Being and Nothingness so that he can be aware of what "we" think is the mauvais foi to which he is encumbered. And of course, we are not sure whether or not there is such a thing. eduard...
    eduardathome Jul 26, 2013
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  • hb3g, The problem of course, is that one is never out of everything. I suppose the objective in life is to find a role that you like to play. eduard -----Original Message----- From: Herman Triplegood Sent: Thursday, July 25, 2013 2:57 PM To: existlist@^$1 Subject: [existlist] Re: vertigo & inkwells That is what being in the Army felt like to me. Right now, it is what my marriage...
    eduardathome Jul 26, 2013
  • I see now that perhaps Jim used the word "Vertigo". That's the problem with this sort of description of Existentialism. The term is being used in fashion different from its real meaning. Vertigo has nothing to do with jumping or falling from a height. It is a sense of imbalance or spinning which has physical causes ... regardless of Alfred Hitchcock. But then you are piling more...
    eduardathome Jul 25, 2013
  • Will do. eduard -----Original Message----- From: Mary Sent: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 6:22 PM To: existlist@^$1 Subject: [existlist] Re: fixed nature of a human being? You be sure to frequent that cafe in order to save the waiter from having to read Sartre. Mary --- In existlist@^$2, eduardathome wrote: > > Interesting. Before, it was said that the waiter should simply recognize...
    eduardathome Jul 24, 2013
  • Interesting. Before, it was said that the waiter should simply recognize that ultimately he was a human being rather than the role that he played. Now it isn't enough to recognize that one is a human being, but also one must have an understanding of why in terms of Sartre's being in-itself and being for-itself. It would seem that Sartre is not only demanding that the waiter get out...
    eduardathome Jul 24, 2013
  • I would take "philosophy" in the common sense of the word. That is, it is more than just a study, but rather a way of living. How should one encounter the world and react to what it places upon us. Freedom is the range over which one can make choices. Or simply that ability to make that one choice. Sometimes the amount of freedom is dependent upon what kind of choices are being...
    eduardathome Jul 24, 2013
  • Does the waiter really suffer vertigo because he has to choose being a waiter each morning?? I seriously doubt it. McCulloch is trying to dramatize the thing. I would suggest that worrying about whether or not he is an inkwell [to use McCulloch's terms] is the last thing on the waiter's mind. I think McCulloch is right in saying that the word "being" or "etre" is a verb. The "being...
    eduardathome Jul 23, 2013
  • "Jaded Existentialist" is another label. It depends upon what the "so what" is for. Sometimes it is a rhetorical question seeking for some response. That Sartre's existentialism is not easily understood is a fault of the writer. As I have said many times, the work is likely expressing some very simple and fundamental concepts. The very fact that there are hundreds if not thousands...
    eduardathome Jul 23, 2013