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Even More Colours of the Rainbow

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  • Charles Vermont
    Thom, I m still stumped - the only New York 1957 listing I have is for The Transcendence of the Ego , a translation of Sartre s 1937 work. I shall be very
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 31, 1999
      Thom,

      I'm still stumped - the only New York 1957 listing I have is for 'The Transcendence of the Ego', a translation of Sartre's 1937 work. I shall be very upset if my bibliography is incomplete...

      On the point you make, I'm still not sure I agree with you. I certainly do not feel qualified to say whether someone else had made good or bad choices, and I have even less confidence in making those calls a priori. After all, I find I learn more from my mistakes than from my successes - sometimes I make a poor choice and reap an unpleasant outcome, but in another sense this moves me on as a human being.

      You wrote: 'Ultimately the person is free to do whatever s/he wants, but s/he may be wrong. We may make bad choices. And these can be identified by other people.'

      Surely the only way to identify a bad choice is to judge it against a set of absolute principles? If this is so, then you are denying my freedom of choice to believe in:

      a.. A different set of absolute principles
      b.. The non-existence of any set of absolute principles
      I believe that if existentialism stands for anything, it is opposed to the absolutes of Cartesian and Kantian dogma.

      ... but perhaps I have misunderstood what you are saying.

      All the best

      Charles Vermont
    • T Brooks
      Thank you for your reply. And, yes, this book exists: I am looking at it. May be out of print. Bought at used book store.
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 31, 1999
        Thank you for your reply. And, yes, this book exists: I am looking at it.
        May be out of print. Bought at used book store.
      • Tom
        CV wrote:- Surely the only way to identify a bad choice is to judge it against a set of absolute principles? If this is so, then you are denying my freedom of
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 1, 1999
          CV wrote:-
          Surely the only way to identify a bad choice is to judge it against a set of absolute principles? If this is so, then you are denying my freedom of choice to believe in:
          a.. A different set of absolute principles
          b.. The non-existence of any set of absolute principles

          If you can't agree on the same goals or absolute principals then surely there's no possible constructive debate except for on the validity of those goals or absolute principles?

          Correct me if I'm over-simplyfying things here. In fact no, you can't "correct" me because that would require the application of a set of absolute principles and would be denying my freedom of choice to a different set of them! lol

          Myself....I'm starting to deliberate over the worth of sharing existential views if you fit Charles's definition of an "existentialist".

          Tom
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