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being and nothing again

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  • Mary
    Having sensory deficiency may cause someone to obsess about their neurons and confuse this with philosophy. A lack (nothingness) where there used to be
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 15, 2013
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      Having sensory deficiency may cause someone to obsess about their neurons and confuse this with philosophy. A lack (nothingness) where there used to be something becomes more significant than if there weren't this lack. A pleasant sensory experience may suffer from an intrusive thought: this experience may just as well not have occurred as occurred, so why not enjoy it. A bad sensory experience makes us desire its nothingness.

      Nothingness, that worm coiled in my spine between my body and my brain, tells me what I no longer have and can't do, and causes me to work harder at remembering this nothing. At some point even memory fails; short term memory goes first. What is forgotten has become as nothing. I've learned to think differently because of what I don't have.

      Reason is the purpose of philosophy. Sensory perception forms and is formed by thought, but thought is as much nothing as being. If what we don't know or have causes us to think, then nothingness and being are intertwined.

      Mary
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