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Will to Power and Nihilism

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  • cvas2002@home.com
    Hi, B.G. The issue of nihilism is not just about values or tranvaluation of values; our value system does not allow ourselves to exercise power or attempt to
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2002
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      Hi, B.G.

      The issue of nihilism is not just about values or tranvaluation of values; our value system does not allow ourselves to exercise power or attempt to seek and create happiness, but instead is mired in resentment and endless rationalization. We are machines constructed for no purpose, aim, or goal. We are all nihilitics, unless we become "supermen" (the advent of which is also purposeless.) If the ideal is to be formulated, it must be done in terms of the will to power which Nietzsche claimed to be man's most basic drive, and "to philosophize with a hammer", is nothing but pure nihilism; the result of a faulty value-system turning back on itself, ultimately devaluating itself and causing the experience of nothingness on the many levels of human consciousness. Living things aim to discharge their strenght and express their will to power, a power out of expansive energy which can entail danger, pain, lies, deception and masks. "there are no facts, only interpretetions." There is no dichotomy in Nietzsche.

      The arguments of philosophy are always obscure. Perhaps, even Derrida's deconsttruction theory is no different to the skepticism of Montaigne or Hume, which can be interpreted as self- defeating by using language and reason respectively to explain the nature of things, and thus, become nihilitic themselves (no to mention Eigen's glass bead game with his self-regulating nature of out-of-equilibrium dissipative systems as "will to power".) Man is part of nature and cannot conceive of it as different toward him without being indifferent toward himself-- i.e., sinking into nihilism.

      Maybe a quotation from the very source will make my point clearer: "What I relate is the history of the next two centuries. I describe what is coming, what can no longer come differently: the advent of nihilsm. This history can be related even now; for necessity itself is at work here." ( Nietzsche's preface on Will to Power, edited by W. Kaufmann.)

      B.G., to think that Nietzsche is no a nihilistic in any of his books, especially his notebooks, is the same as to think that Jesus Christ was an atheist.


      Charles


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ryan Dewald
      Well written Charles, I can think of nothing better to read this monday morning than a synopsis of nihilism! Work work work. Ryan ... From: cvas2002@home.com
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 4, 2002
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        Well written Charles, I can think of nothing better to read this monday
        morning than a synopsis of nihilism! Work work work.

        Ryan

        -----Original Message-----
        From: cvas2002@... [mailto:cvas2002@...]
        Sent: Friday, February 01, 2002 6:23 PM
        To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [existlist] Will to Power and Nihilism


        Hi, B.G.

        The issue of nihilism is not just about values or tranvaluation of
        values; our value system does not allow ourselves to exercise power or
        attempt to seek and create happiness, but instead is mired in resentment and
        endless rationalization. We are machines constructed for no purpose, aim, or
        goal. We are all nihilitics, unless we become "supermen" (the advent of
        which is also purposeless.) If the ideal is to be formulated, it must be
        done in terms of the will to power which Nietzsche claimed to be man's most
        basic drive, and "to philosophize with a hammer", is nothing but pure
        nihilism; the result of a faulty value-system turning back on itself,
        ultimately devaluating itself and causing the experience of nothingness on
        the many levels of human consciousness. Living things aim to discharge their
        strenght and express their will to power, a power out of expansive energy
        which can entail danger, pain, lies, deception and masks. "there are no
        facts, only interpretetions." There is no dichotomy in Nietzsche.

        The arguments of philosophy are always obscure. Perhaps, even Derrida's
        deconsttruction theory is no different to the skepticism of Montaigne or
        Hume, which can be interpreted as self- defeating by using language and
        reason respectively to explain the nature of things, and thus, become
        nihilitic themselves (no to mention Eigen's glass bead game with his
        self-regulating nature of out-of-equilibrium dissipative systems as "will to
        power".) Man is part of nature and cannot conceive of it as different toward
        him without being indifferent toward himself-- i.e., sinking into nihilism.

        Maybe a quotation from the very source will make my point clearer:
        "What I relate is the history of the next two centuries. I describe what is
        coming, what can no longer come differently: the advent of nihilsm. This
        history can be related even now; for necessity itself is at work here." (
        Nietzsche's preface on Will to Power, edited by W. Kaufmann.)

        B.G., to think that Nietzsche is no a nihilistic in any of his books,
        especially his notebooks, is the same as to think that Jesus Christ was an
        atheist.


        Charles


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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